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This meeting took place in 2014



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Plant Signaling: Dynamic Properties (B1)


Organizer(s) Ottoline Leyser, Junko Kyozuka and Pamela C. Ronald
February 5—10, 2014
Beaver Run Resort • Breckenridge, Colorado USA
Discounted Abstract Deadline: Oct 15, 2013
Abstract Deadline: Nov 7, 2013
Scholarship Deadline: Oct 15, 2013
Discounted Registration Deadline: Dec 5, 2013

Sponsored by Monsanto Company

Summary of Meeting:
In recent years, rapid progress has been made in elucidating the molecular events underlying perception of extracellular signals and their transduction to regulate specific responses. These advances in understanding make it possible to consider the emergent behavior of signaling cascades. In each signaling system, the configuration and dynamics of the underlying molecular interactions deliver specific properties linking the signal to its response. For example there could be a graded response to the level of signal or a tight threshold below which there is no response, and above which there is a maximal response. It is these higher order properties that are functionally important for the success of the organism, and therefore they are the level at which natural selection has acted to shape each signaling system. It is now becoming possible to investigate these higher order properties and to understand how apparently different molecular level events can nonetheless produce signaling systems with similar properties. The incorporation of mathematical and computational modeling, and the adoption synthetic biology approaches are becoming important tools in this endeavor. To capture this exciting new synthesis, we propose a symposium focusing on the relationship between molecular level events and their higher order behavior, comparing the properties of signaling systems in diverse species, including non-plant examples. The symposium will be structured around common signaling features, such as switching between on and off states, the control of specificity, robustness in an unstable environment, and modulation of the sensitivity of the system by its activity or by external factors.

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Conference Program    Print  |   View meeting in 12 hr (am/pm) time


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 5

16:00—20:00
Arrival and Registration

Foyer

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Summit Gallery
08:00—11:15
Signal Sensitivity and its Modulation by the Environment I
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online. Purchase an Abstract Book from this meeting
This session will address the question, "How is sensitivity achieved and how can it be modulated according to the prevailing conditions?"

Peaks 4-5
Tetsuya Higashiyama, Nagoya University, Japan
Live-Cell Analysis of Signal Sensing from Pollen Tube Guidance to Early Embryogenesis

* James C. Locke, University of Cambridge, UK
Stochastic Signal Encoding Strategies in Single Cells

Giles E.D. Oldroyd, John Innes Centre, UK
Calcium Encoding and Decoding during Symbiotic Signaling

Yan Liang, University of Missouri, USA
Short Talk: Nonlegumes Respond to Rhizobial Nod Factors by Suppressing MAMP-Triggered Innate Immunity

Cordelia Bolle, Biozentrum der LMU München, Germany
Phytochrome A in High and Very Low Fluence Light Signaling

Enamul Huq, University of Texas, Austin, USA
Short Talk: PIF1 Enhances the E3 Ligase Activity of COP1 to Synergistically Repress Photomorphogenesis in the Dark

09:40—10:00
Coffee Break

Foyer
11:15—13:00
Poster Setup

Peaks 1-3
13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Peaks 1-3
11:15—14:30
On Own for Lunch and Recreation

14:30—16:30
Workshop: The Versatility of Calcium-Mediated Signaling

Peaks 4-5
Tina Romeis, Free University Berlin, Germany
Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase/NADPH Oxidase Activation Circuit Functions in Rapid Defense Signal Propagation to Distal Plant Sites

Jörg Kudla, Universität Münster, Germany
Integration of Calcium and ROS Signaling in Arabidopsis

Rainer Waadt, University of California, San Diego, USA
Genetically Encoded Reporters for the Direct Visualization of Abscisic Acid Distribution and Transport in Arabidopsis

Masatsugu Toyota, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA
Wound-Induced Rapid Systemic Ca2+ Transmission through the Phloem

* Julian I. Schroeder, University of California, San Diego, USA
New Insights into Early Abscisic Acid and Calcium Specificity Signal Transduction Mechanisms in Guard Cells

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Foyer
17:00—18:45
Signal Sensitivity and its Modulation by the Environment II
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online. Purchase an Abstract Book from this meeting
The session addresses the question, "How is sensitivity achieved and how can it be modulated according to the prevailing conditions?"

Peaks 4-5
* Cynthia Weinig, University of Wyoming, USA

Xinnian Dong, Duke University, USA
Systemic Acquired Resistance: Modulation of the Sensitivity of the Plant Immune Response

Neil Dalchau, Microsoft Research, UK
Mathematical Tools for Dissecting the Ins and Outs of Circadian Clocks

Janet Braam, Rice University, USA
Short Talk: Timing Is Everything: How the Plant Circadian Clock Enhances Defense

18:45—19:45
Social Hour with Lite Bites

Peaks 1-3
19:30—22:00
Poster Session 1

Peaks 1-3

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Summit Gallery
08:00—11:15
Signal-Regulated On-Off Switches, their Reversibility and Resetting I
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online. Purchase an Abstract Book from this meeting
This session addresses the question, "How can major signaling decisions be made without error, and how can they be reversed?"

Peaks 4-5
* Pamela C. Ronald, University of California, Davis, USA

Sibum Sung, University of Texas at Austin, USA
Vernalization: Epigenetic Memory of Winter

Beronda L. Montgomery, Michigan State University, USA
Phytochromes and Nuclear-Plastid Coordination during Photomorphogenesis

Sarah M. Assmann, Pennsylvania State University, USA
Dynamic Modeling of Stomatal Aperture Regulation

Miyo Terao Morita, Nagoya University, Japan
Genetic Analyses of Novel Genes Involved in Gravity Signaling Process in Statocytes of Arabidopsis thaliana

Satoru Okamoto, National Institute for Basic Biology, Japan
Short Talk: Root-Derived CLE Glycopeptides Control Nodulation by Direct Binding to HAR1 Receptor Kinase

Edith Pierre-Jerome, University of Washington, USA
Short Talk: Recapitulation of the Auxin Signaling Pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Foyer
11:15—13:00
Poster Setup

Peaks 1-3
13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Peaks 1-3
11:15—17:00
On Own for Lunch and Recreation

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Foyer
17:00—19:00
Signal-Regulated On-Off Switches, their Reversibility and Resetting II
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online. Purchase an Abstract Book from this meeting
This session addresses the question, "How can major signaling decisions be made without error, and how can they be reversed?"

Peaks 4-5
* Ian T. Baldwin, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Germany

Paul B. Rainey, Massey University, New Zealand
Stochastic Switching and the Evolution of Development

Christa Testerink, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands
Salinity-Induced Phosphatidic Acid Formation Acts as a Localized Switch to Control Root Growth and Development

Junko Kyozuka, University of Tokyo, Japan
Switching Developmental Phase in the Axillary Buds

Cyril Zipfel, Sainsbury Laboratory, UK
Short Talk: The Dilemma of Plants: To Grow or to Defend – the Role of Brassinosteroids

19:00—20:00
Social Hour with Lite Bites

Peaks 1-3
19:30—22:00
Poster Session 2

Peaks 1-3

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Summit Gallery
08:00—11:15
Signaling Robustness in a Noisy Environment I
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online. Purchase an Abstract Book from this meeting
This session addresses the question, "How can signaling systems operate stably under noisy and fluctuating environmental conditions?"

Peaks 4-5
* Junko Kyozuka, University of Tokyo, Japan

Andrew J. Millar, University of Edinburgh, UK
How Biological Timing Matters to Arabidopsis

Cynthia Weinig, University of Wyoming, USA
Characterizing the Genetic Architecture and Adaptive Significance of the Circadian Clock in Seasonal Settings

Richard J. Morris, John Innes Centre, UK
Buffering Noise in the Control of Flowering Time

Rachel A. Hillmer, University of Minnesota, USA
Short Talk: Strength without Stiffness: How the Plant Immune Signaling Network Achieves both Robustness and Tunability

Tzyy-Jen Chiou, Academia Sinica, Taiwan
Sensing Phosphate Availability: MicroRNA-Mediated Regulation of Phosphate Homeostasis

Dan Szymanski, Purdue University, USA
Short Talk: Integration of ROP Signaling with Cytoskeletal and Cell Wall Systems during Arabidopsis Trichome Morphogenesis

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Foyer
11:15—17:00
On Own for Lunch and Recreation

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Foyer
17:00—19:00
Signaling Robustness in a Noisy Environment II
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online. Purchase an Abstract Book from this meeting
This session addresses the question, "How can signaling systems operate stably under noisy and fluctuating environmental conditions?"

Peaks 4-5
* Paul B. Rainey, Massey University, New Zealand

Ben Scheres, Wageningen University Research, Netherlands
Root Meristem Homeostasis Controlled by a Transcription Factor Gradient

Rüdiger Simon, Heinrich-Heine University, Germany
Short Talk: Dynamics of Stem Cell Signaling Pathways in Root Meristems

Elliot M. Meyerowitz, California Institute of Technology, USA
Robustness in Cytokinin Signaling at the Shoot Apical Meristem

Jan Traas, ENS Lyon, France
Organ Formation at the Shoot Apical Meristem: From Morphodynamics to Morphomechanics

19:00—20:00
Social Hour with Lite Bites

Peaks 1-3

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Summit Gallery
08:00—11:15
Specificity and Integration in Signal Transduction I
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online. Purchase an Abstract Book from this meeting
This session addresses the question, "How can signaling systems respond with high specificity to particular signals, while allowing the integration of information from multiple signals?"

Peaks 4-5
* Andrew J. Millar, University of Edinburgh, UK

Michael Hothorn, University of Geneva, Switzerland
The Twists and Turns of Plant Membrane Signaling

Pamela C. Ronald, University of California, Davis, USA
Sulfation Controls Specificity of the Rice XA21-Mediated Immune Response

Mark A. Estelle, University of California, San Diego, USA
Auxin Perception and Response in Arabidopsis and Moss

Michael Wrzaczek, University of Helsinki, Finland
Short Talk: The Cysteine-Rich Receptor-Like Kinases in Arabidopsis – A Phenotypic Framework for Stress Responses and ROS Signaling

Ian T. Baldwin, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Germany
Plasticity in the Signaling that Nicotiana attenuata Uses to Cope with Biotic Stresses

Ronald Pierik, Utrecht University, Netherlands
Short Talk: Integrating Light Signal Dynamics in Dense Stands; A Mechanism to Evaluate Competitive Threat of Neighbors

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Foyer
11:15—17:00
On Own for Lunch and Recreation

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Foyer
17:00—18:35
Specificity and Integration in Signal Transduction II
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online. Purchase an Abstract Book from this meeting
This session addresses the question, "How can signaling systems respond with high specificity to particular signals, while allowing the integration of information from multiple signals?"

Peaks 4-5
* Christa Testerink, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands

Keiko U. Torii, University of Washington, USA
Receptor Kinase Specificity and Integration in Stomatal Patterning

Yoshikatsu Matsubayashi, National Institute for Basic Biology, Japan
Toward the Identification of Novel Peptide Signals in Plants

Xuelu Wang, Fudan University, China
Short Talk: Identification and Characterization of a Key Substrate of MAX2 in Strigolactone Signaling Pathway to Regulate Shoot Branching in Arabidopsis

18:35—19:30
Panel: Future Directions for the Field

Peaks 4-5
* Elliot M. Meyerowitz, California Institute of Technology, USA

Richard J. Morris, John Innes Centre, UK

Keiko U. Torii, University of Washington, USA

Jan Traas, ENS Lyon, France

Ben Scheres, Wageningen University Research, Netherlands

19:30—20:30
Social Hour with Lite Bites

Peaks 1-3
20:00—23:00
Entertainment

Peaks 1-3

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 10

 
Departure


*Session Chair †Invited, not yet responded.



Keystone Symposia thanks our Sponsor for generously supporting this meeting:

Monsanto Company

We gratefully acknowledge support for this conference from:


Directors' Fund


These generous unrestricted gifts allow our Directors to schedule meetings in a wide variety of important areas, many of which are in the early stages of research.

Click here to view all of the donors who support the Directors' Fund.



We gratefully acknowledge additional support for this conference from:

Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation KWS SAAT AG
Syngenta Biotechnology, Inc.
 

We gratefully acknowledge the generous grant for this conference provided by:


National Science Foundation (NSF)

Grant No. MCB-1348958

The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the National Science Foundation; nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.


We gratefully acknowledge additional in-kind support for this conference from those foregoing speaker expense reimbursements:



Amgen


We appreciate the organizations that provide Keystone Symposia with additional support, such as marketing and advertising:


American Society of Plant Biologists

Biochemical Society / Biochemical Journal

Special thanks to the following for their support of Keystone Symposia initiatives to increase participation at this meeting by scientists from underrepresented backgrounds:


Click here to view more of these organizations


If your organization is interested in joining these entities in support of Keystone Symposia, please contact: Sarah Lavicka, Assistant Director of Development, Email: sarahl@keystonesymposia.org,
Phone:+1 970-262-2690

Click here for more information on Industry Support and Recognition Opportunities.

If you are interested in becoming an advertising/marketing in-kind partner, please contact:
Yvonne Psaila, Director, Marketing and Communications, Email: yvonnep@keystonesymposia.org,
Phone:+1 970-262-2676