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This meeting took place in 2015


Here are the related meetings in 2017:
Microbiome in Health and Disease (J8)

For a complete list of the meetings for the upcoming/current season, see our meeting list, or search for a meeting.

Gut Microbiota Modulation of Host Physiology: The Search for Mechanism (C1)


Organizer(s) Fredrik Bäckhed, Ruth E. Ley and Yasmine Belkaid
March 1—6, 2015
Keystone Resort • Keystone, Colorado USA
Discounted Abstract Deadline: Nov 3, 2014
Abstract Deadline: Dec 2, 2014
Scholarship Deadline: Nov 3, 2014
Discounted Registration Deadline: Jan 5, 2015

Sponsored by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Cell Research, Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research and Theravance Biopharma

Summary of Meeting:
Over the past decade, it has become evident that the gut microbiome is an important environmental factor that affects many physiologic processes, such as cell proliferation and differentiation, behavior, immune function and metabolism. Moreover, it may contribute to a wide variety of diseases, including cancer, inflammatory diseases, metabolic diseases and responses to pathogens. This meeting will emphasize mechanistic understandings of the relationship between microbiota and host physiology, rather than simply characterize microbiota in different disease states. Speakers will address not only bacteria in the gut, but also fungi and microbiome on the skin and in the lung. The goal of the meeting is to facilitate the understanding by which mechanisms of the microbiota modulate host physiologic processes and increase our understanding of how an altered microbiota contributes to health and disease in humans. In addition, the broad representation of speakers from diverse fields, such as microbiology, immunology, physiology and infectious disease, is likely to foster new collaborations.

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No registration fees are used to fund entertainment or alcohol at this conference

Conference Program    Print  |   View meeting in 12 hr (am/pm) time


SUNDAY, MARCH 1

16:00—20:00
Arrival and Registration

Longs Peak Foyer
18:00—20:00
Welcome Mixer
No registration fees are used to fund alcohol served at this function.

Longs Peak Foyer

MONDAY, MARCH 2

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Shavano/Torreys
08:00—08:15
Welcome Remarks
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Longs/Grays Peak
Fredrik Bäckhed, University of Gothenburg, Sweden

Ruth E. Ley, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Germany

Yasmine Belkaid, NIAID, National Institutes of Health, USA

08:15—09:15
Keynote Address
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Grays Peak
* Fredrik Bäckhed, University of Gothenburg, Sweden

Herbert (Skip) W. Virgin, Washington University School of Medicine, USA
Role of the Virome and Virome-Bacterial Microbiome Interactions in Immunity and Disease

09:15—11:00
Gut Microbiota and Metabolic Disease
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Longs/Grays Peak
* Patrice D. Cani, Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium

Naoko Ohtani, Tokyo University of Science, Japan
Obesity-Induced Gut Microbial Metabolite, DCA, Promotes Liver Cancer through Senescence Secretome

Fredrik Bäckhed, University of Gothenburg, Sweden
Gut Microbiota and Type 2 Diabetes

Megan T. Baldridge, Washington University School of Medicine, USA
Short Talk: Heritable Fecal IgA Levels Distinguish Extra-Chromosomal Phenotypic Variation

09:40—10:00
Coffee Break

Longs Peak Foyer
11:00—13:00
Poster Setup

Shavano/Torreys
13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Shavano/Torreys
11:00—17:00
On Own for Lunch

14:30—16:30
Workshop 1: Novel Models to Study Host-Microbe Interactions

Longs/Grays Peak
* François Leulier, Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon, France

Jeremy J. Barr, San Diego State University, USA
Bacteriophage as Mucosal Hunters

Juris A. Grasis, San Diego State University, USA
The Basal Metazoan Hydra as a Model for Host-Mucosa-Virome Interactions

Jennifer S. Hampton, University of Oregon, USA
Microbial Signaling Mechanisms Important for Pancreatic Beta Cell Expansion in Zebrafish

Siegfried Hapfelmeier, University of Bern, Switzerland
Next-Generation Models of Reversible Intestinal Colonization: Probing Mucosal Immunity

Carolyn Elya, University of California, Berkeley, USA
Employing Drosophila Melanogaster to Investigate How Gut Microbes affect Host Behavior

Kate P. Coyle, North Carolina State University, USA
Impact of Dietary Adaptation on Gastrointestinal Biology across Trophic Levels in Lake Malawi Cichlids

Claire Maynard, Durham University, UK
A Novel Mechanism to Improve Host Health by Intervening with Microbial Metabolism Discovered Using the C. elegans: E. coli Model

Meng Wu, Washington University in St. Louis, USA
Identifying the Genetic Underpinnings of Niche in Human Gut Bacteria in Different Diet Contexts Using Multi-Taxon INSeq and Gnotobiotic Mice

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Longs Peak Foyer
17:00—19:15
Microbiota-Diet Interactions
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Longs/Grays Peak
Stanley L. Hazen, Cleveland Clinical Foundation, USA
Diet, Microbiota and Cardiometabolic Disease

Patrice D. Cani, Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium
Gut Microbes, Host and Diet: Focus on a Novel Lipid Sensor

Amir Zarrinpar, University of California, San Diego and The Salk Institute, USA
Short Talk: Diet and Feeding Pattern Affect the Diurnal Dynamics of the Gut Microbiome

* Liping Zhao, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China
Dysbiosis of Gut Microbiota as a Checkpoint for Obesity Development

Shirong Liu, Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School, USA
Short Talk: Identification of Fecal MicroRNAs and their Role in Regulating Gut Microbiota

19:15—20:15
Social Hour with Lite Bites
No registration fees are used to fund alcohol served at this function.

Shavano/Torreys
19:30—22:00
Poster Session 1

Shavano/Torreys

TUESDAY, MARCH 3

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Shavano/Torreys
08:00—11:15
Microbiota Induction of the Immune System I
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Longs/Grays Peak
* Fiona M. Powrie, University of Oxford, UK

Kenya Honda, School of Medicine, Keio University, Japan
Regulation of T Cells by the Gut Microbiota

Yasmine Belkaid, NIAID, National Institutes of Health, USA
Compartmentalized Control of Tissue Immunity by Commensals

Dan R. Littman, HHMI/New York University School of Medicine, USA
Programming of T Cell Effector Functions by the Intestinal Microbiota

Wendy S. Garrett, Harvard School of Public Health, USA
Short-Chain Fatty Acids and Regulatory T Cells

Thaddeus S. Stappenbeck, Washington University School of Medicine, USA
Short Talk: Regulation of Epithelial Turnover and Repair by Host-Virome Interactions

Thomas C. Fung, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Short Talk: A Lymphoid Tissue-Resident Commensal Bacterium Modulates Local Immune Responses in the Intestine

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Longs Peak Foyer
11:15—13:00
Poster Setup

Shavano/Torreys
13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Shavano/Torreys
11:15—17:00
On Own for Lunch

14:30—16:30
Workshop 2: Cell Press Panel on How to Get Published
This workshop led by Cell Press Editors from Immunity, Cell, Cell Metabolism, Cell Reports and Cell Host and Microbe will help you understand how the editorial process works, give you tips to help you get your work published and provide an editor's perspective on multiple topics. This is your opportunity to go directly to the source and ask Cell Press Editors anything!
Panelists:
Peter Lee, Editor, Immunity
Cindy Lu, Scientific Editor, Cell
Nikla Emambokus, Editor, Cell Metabolism
Sara Hamilton, Scientific Editor, Cell Reports
Ella Hinson, Scientific Editor, Cell Host & Microbe
Angela Messmer-Blust, Scientific Editor, Conferences

Longs/Grays Peak
16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Longs Peak Foyer
17:00—19:00
Microbiota Induction of the Immune System II
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Longs/Grays Peak
* Wendy S. Garrett, Harvard School of Public Health, USA

Gérard Eberl, Institut Pasteur, France
Regulation of RORgt+ T Cells by Microbiota and Diet

Fiona M. Powrie, University of Oxford, UK
Mucosal Inflammation: From IBD to Colon Cancer

Andrew J.S. Macpherson, University of Bern, Switzerland
Stratification of Intestinal Microbes

Duane R. Wesemann, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, USA
Short Talk: Role of Microbes in B Cell Lymphopoiesis and Early Ig Repertoire Development

19:00—20:00
Social Hour with Lite Bites
No registration fees are used to fund alcohol served at this function.

Shavano/Torreys
19:30—22:00
Poster Session 2

Shavano/Torreys

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Shavano/Torreys
08:00—11:15
Emerging Areas of Host-Microbiome Interactions
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Longs/Grays Peak
* John F. Rawls, Duke University, USA

David M. Underhill, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, USA
Intestinal Fungi and their Role in Disease

Julie A. Segre, NHGRI, National Institutes of Health, USA
Skin Microbiome: Bacterial, Fungal Diversity Across the Human Landscape

François Leulier, Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon, France
Host/Lactobacilli Mutualism: "Learning on the Fly"

Marie-Claire Arrieta, University of British Columbia, Canada
Short Talk: Early-Infancy Microbial and Metabolic Alterations Impact Risk of Asthma

Anisa S. Ismail, Princeton University, USA
Short Talk: Identification of a Host-Produced Molecule that Mimics Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) Activity

Elisabeth Kernbauer, New York University School of Medicine, USA
Short Talk: An Enteric Viral Infection Can Functionally Replace the Beneficial Cues Provided by Commensal Bacteria

Jean-Marc Chatel, Institute Micalis, France
Short Talk: Identification of an Anti-Inflammatory Protein from Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, a Commensal Bacterium Deficient in Crohn's Disease

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Longs Peak Foyer
11:15—13:00
Poster Setup

Shavano/Torreys
13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Shavano/Torreys
11:15—17:00
On Own for Lunch

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Longs Peak Foyer
17:00—19:00
Mucus-Microbiota Interactions
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Longs/Grays Peak
* Justin L. Sonnenburg, Stanford University, USA

Gunnar C. Hansson, University of Gothenburg, Sweden
The Mucus Layer as First Line of Defense

Lora V. Hooper, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA
Circadian Regulation of Intestinal Host-Microbe Interactions

Eric C. Martens, University of Michigan Medical School, USA
Think Globally, Act Locally: Regulated Deployment of Diet and Mucus Polysaccharide Degradation by Gut Bacteria

Hiutung Chu, California Institute of Technology, USA
Short Talk: Microbiota-Induced Autophagy Promotes Mucosal Tolerance

19:00—20:00
Social Hour with Lite Bites
No registration fees are used to fund alcohol served at this function.

Shavano/Torreys
19:30—22:00
Poster Session 3

Shavano/Torreys

THURSDAY, MARCH 5

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Shavano/Torreys
08:00—11:00
Gut Microbiota in Relation to Infectious Diseases
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Longs/Grays Peak
* Lora V. Hooper, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA

Wolf-Dietrich Hardt, ETH Zürich, Switzerland
Salmonella Diarrhea Results from Multiple Pathogen-Microbiota-Host Interactions

Justin L. Sonnenburg, Stanford University, USA
Interactions between the Microbiota and Pathogenic Bacteria

Gabriel Nuñez, University of Michigan, USA
Control of Enteric Pathogens by Host Immunity and the Microbiota

Eric G. Pamer, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, USA
Microbiota-Mediated Defense Against Intestinal Infection

Mario M. Zaiss, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, EPFL, Switzerland
Short Talk: Intestinal Helminths Modulate Allergic Inflammation Indirectly by Altering Bacterial Metabolism

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Longs Peak Foyer
11:00—17:00
On Own for Lunch

14:30—16:30
Panel: The Integrative Human Microbiome Project (iHMP): Dynamic Analysis of Microbiome-Host Omics Profiles during Periods of Human Health and Disease
The Integrative Human Microbiome Project (iHMP) is the second phase of the National Institute of Health (NIH) Common Fund's Human Microbiome Project (HMP) program. The mission of the overall HMP is to generate resources to permit comprehensive characterization of the human microbiota to further our understanding of how the microbiome impacts human health and disease. In this phase of the program, the iHMP is creating integrated longitudinal datasets of biological properties from both the microbiome and host from three different cohort studies of microbiome-associated conditions using multiple "omics" technologies. Tools, datasets and other resources from the first phase of the project are available at the HMP DACC. During this session, we will provide an overview of the data and resources freely available to the research community as derived from the three iHMP projects: 1) the Multi-Omic Microbiome Study: Pregnancy Initiative (MOMS-PI) at Virginia Commonwealth University, 2) the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Multi'omic Data (IBDMDB) resource from the Broad Institute and a nation-wide research tam, and 3) Integrated Personal 'Omics Profiling (IPOP) from Stanford University and the Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine. For more information or to get involved with the iHMP, please see http://hmp2.org.

Longs/Grays Peaks
Robert W. Karp, National Institutes of Health, USA

Gregory A. Buck, Virginia Commonwealth University, USA

Curtis Huttenhower, Harvard School of Public Health, USA

Wenyu Zhou, Stanford University, USA

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Longs Peak Foyer
17:00—18:45
Microbiome Interactions with Host Genetics: Future Insights to New Mechanisms
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Longs/Grays Peak
* Gabriel Nuñez, University of Michigan, USA

Jens Walter, University of Alberta, Canada
Bacterial Genetic Factors that Determine Host-Specific Colonization: The Case of Lactobacilli

John F. Rawls, Duke University, USA
Microbial Regulation of Intestinal Lipid Metabolism and Gene Expression

Ruth E. Ley, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Germany
Host Genetics Analyses of Microbiome Composition: Gene Screens for Identifying Novel Mechanisms

18:45—19:15
Meeting Wrap-Up
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.
Organizers will discuss outcomes, future directions and present their choice of poster award.

Longs/Grays Peak
19:15—20:15
Social Hour with Lite Bites
No registration fees are used to fund alcohol served at this function.

Shavano/Torreys
20:00—23:00
Entertainment
Entertainment is not subsidized by conference registration fees nor any U.S. federal government grants. Funding for this expense is provided by other revenue sources.

Shavano/Torreys

FRIDAY, MARCH 6

 
Departure


*Session Chair †Invited, not yet responded.



Keystone Symposia thanks our Sponsors for generously supporting this meeting:

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Cell Research
Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research
Theravance Biopharma
 

We gratefully acknowledge support for this conference from:


Directors' Fund


These generous unrestricted gifts allow our Directors to schedule meetings in a wide variety of important areas, many of which are in the early stages of research.

Click here to view all of the donors who support the Directors' Fund.



We gratefully acknowledge additional support for this conference from:


Mucosal Immunology Studies Team (MIST)

Research Diets, Inc.

We gratefully acknowledge the generous grant for this conference provided by:


National Institutes of Health

Grant No. 1R13DK104614-01

Funding for this conference was made possible (in part) by 1 R13 DK104614-01 from NIDDK. The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention by trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.


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Special thanks to the following for their support of Keystone Symposia initiatives to increase participation at this meeting by scientists from underrepresented backgrounds:


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Phone:+1 970-262-2690

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