Virtual Keystone Symposia

From Neuroscience to Therapy — How Do We Get There?
FREE LIVE Webcast | Thursday, February 11, 2016 | 3:15—4:45 PM EST

Sponsored by Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited

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Join us for the Virtual Keystone Symposia global webcast on neuroscience. Open to all, this free, spirited 90-minute discussion is targeted at the scientific community and will involve four industry thought leaders discussing the state of the field and the path forward. Discussion topics will focus on:

  • Basic nature of disease and how it poses a challenge
  • GWAS studies
  • How to do studies correctly, moving from failure to success
  • How to identify, prioritize, and validate targets


Meet the Moderator & Panelists


Steven E. Hyman, M.D.
Moderator

Benjamin Neale, Ph.D.

Guoping Feng, Ph.D.

Stacie Weninger, Ph.D.




Steven E. Hyman, M.D. — Moderator

Steven E. Hyman, M.D. is Director of the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research at the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, a Core Faculty Member of the Broad Institute, and Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology. From 2001 to 2011, he served as Provost of Harvard University, the University's chief academic officer. As Provost he had a special focus on development of collaborative initiatives in the sciences and engineering spanning multiple disciplines and institutions. From 1996 to 2001, he served as director of the US National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), where he emphasized investment in neuroscience and emerging genetic technologies. He also initiated a series of large practical clinical trials, including an emphasis on children, a population about which little was known.

Dr. Hyman is the editor of the Annual Review of Neuroscience, founding President of the International Neuroethics Society (2008-2014), and President (2015) of the Society for Neuroscience, the leading professional organization for neuroscientists with approximately 40,000 members. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the U.S. National Academies where he serves on the governing Council and the Board of Health Science Policy, and chairs the Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders, which brings together industry, government, academia, patient groups, and foundations. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a fellow of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, and a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association.

Dr. Hyman received his B.A. summa cum laude from Yale College, a B.A. and M.A. from the University of Cambridge, which he attended as a Mellon fellow, and an M.D. cum laude from Harvard Medical School.

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Benjamin Neale, Ph.D.

Benjamin Neale is an assistant professor in the Analytic and Translational Genetics Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), assistant professor in medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS), and an associated researcher at the Broad Institute. Dr. Neale is strongly committed to gaining insights into the genetics of common, complex human diseases. Drs. Neale and Mark Daly, both of whom are associated with the Broad Institute and MGH, lead the ADHD Initiative, a collaborative effort that focuses on genomic studies of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Neale's research and training have focused heavily on statistical methodology. He has analyzed genetic data from large-scale studies of patients with ADHD, autism, age-related macular degeneration, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic disorders. Neale also analyzed data from the first ADHD genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis, which combined the results of four studies to boost statistical power. Dr. Neale contributed to the development of software tools such as PLINK, one of the most frequently used packages for GWAS analysis. In addition to his roles at both the Broad Institute and MGH, Dr. Neale is the head of the ADHD psychiatric genetics GWAS analysis committee and an active member of the broader Psychiatric GWAS Consortium analysis committee, which is charged with analyzing all psychiatric data from these large-scale genome-wide association studies. Dr. Neale also led the design of the exome chip, a genotyping array that captures rare coding variation in a cost-effective manner. To date, over 1.5 million exome chips have been sold.

Dr. Neale studied at the University of Chicago and Virginia Commonwealth University, earning a B.Sc. in genetics. He went on to earn his Ph.D. in human genetics from King’s College in London, UK. Dr. Neale completed his postdoctoral training in Dr. Daly's laboratory at Massachusetts General Hospital. In addition to many local research collaborations, he also serves as advisor and analyst to international genetic research consortia on psychiatric diseases.

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Guoping Feng, Ph.D.

Dr. Feng is the Poitras Chair Professor of Neuroscience in the McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is an Institute Member of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and the Director of Neurobiology at the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research at the Broad Institute. Dr. Feng's research is devoted to understanding the mechanisms regulating the development and function of synapses in the brain and how synaptic dysfunction may contribute to psychiatric disorders. Using genetically engineered animal models, Dr. Feng's laboratory combines cutting-edge technologies and multidisciplinary approaches to unravel the neurobiological mechanisms of OCD, autism and schizophrenia.

Dr. Feng has won numerous awards for his scientific achievements including the Beckman Young Investigator Award, Gill Young Investigator Award, McKnight Neuroscience of Brain Disorders Award, McKnight Technology Innovation Award, and Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Award.

Dr. Feng studied medicine at Zhejiang University School of Medicine in Hangzhou, China. He obtained his Ph.D. from the State University of New York at Buffalo and postdoctoral training at Washington University in St. Louis. Prior to joining the faculty at MIT, he was a faculty member in the Department of Neurobiology, Duke University School of Medicine.

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Stacie Weninger, Ph.D.

Stacie Weninger is the Executive Director of the F-Prime Biomedical Research Initiative. Prior to this position, she was the Senior Director of Science Programs for the Fidelity Foundations. In 2005, Dr. Weninger served as the Project Manager and Senior Analyst for the Task Force on Women in Science at Harvard University. From 2001-2005, she was a Senior Scientist at Cell Press for the journal Neuron. Before joining Cell Press, Dr. Weninger was a postdoctoral research fellow at Children's Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School with Dr. Bruce Yankner. She was a Howard Hughes Medical Institute predoctoral fellow in the Program in Neuroscience at Harvard University. While a graduate student and postdoctoral research fellow, Dr. Weninger was actively involved in undergraduate teaching, winning six teaching awards.

Dr. Weninger received a Ph.D. in neuroscience from Harvard University, and a B.S. degree in chemistry with highest honors from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She currently chairs the Collaboration for Alzheimer's Prevention; is President of Alzforum; serves as Chairman of the Board of Directors for Rugen Therapeutics; and serves as a member of the Board of Directors for Zebra Medical Technologies, Aratome, Inscopix, BRI-Alzan, BRI-Tolan, Q-State Biosciences, and Denali Therapeutics. She previously served as a member of the Board of Directors for Annexon Biosciences.

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Link to prior webcast on HIV/AIDS: Strategies for an Endgame