Granlibakken Tahoe Floorplan

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This meeting took place in 2009



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Chemical Senses: Receptors and Circuits (C7)


Organizer(s) Leslie B. Vosshall and Peter Mombaerts
March 15—19, 2009
Granlibakken Tahoe • Tahoe City, California USA
Abstract Deadline: Nov 17, 2008
Late Abstract Deadline: Dec 15, 2008
Scholarship Deadline: Nov 17, 2008
Early Registration Deadline: Jan 15, 2009

Supported by the Directors' Fund

Summary of Meeting:
The goal of this Keystone Symposium is to bring together both pioneers and newcomers to the neurobiology of the chemical senses to discuss the development and function of neuronal circuits that underlie the perception of odorants, tastants, and pheromones. In the decade since the identification of molecular receptors for chemosensory stimuli, the field is increasingly moving toward questions of how sensory circuits are assembled during development and how they function in mediating chemosensory perception. Researchers are elucidating the molecules and mechanisms that pattern connections from the periphery to the brain. Using electrophysiological and imaging techniques, information processing is being studied mostly at the periphery. However, there is little information about how information is propagated from lower pathways to the cortex (or equivalent) and other higher brain regions. This meeting will highlight recent results using developmental, electrophysiological, functional imaging, and behavioral approaches to elucidate how chemosensory signals are processed in invertebrate and vertebrate model systems, ranging from nematode, fruit fly, zebrafish, mouse, rat, non-human primate to human.

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No registration fees are used to fund entertainment or alcohol at this conference

Conference Program    Print  |   View meeting in 12 hr (am/pm) time


SUNDAY, MARCH 15

15:00—19:30
Registration

Pre Function
19:30—20:30
Opening Lecture
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Mountain
Peter Mombaerts, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Germany
The P Element

20:30—22:00
Workshop 1: Neuroethology and Behavior

Mountain
Hitoshi Sakano, University of Tokyo, Japan
Molecular Basis of Odor Perception in the Mouse

Bill S. Hansson, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Germany
Fruitfly Olfactory Neuroethology

Timothy E. Holy, Washington University in St. Louis, USA
The Mammalian Accessory Olfactory System: Stimuli and Circuitry


MONDAY, MARCH 16

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Granhall
08:00—11:15
Molecular Biology of Smell and Taste
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Mountain
Liqun Luo, Stanford University, USA
Wiring Up the Fly Olfactory Circuit

Leslie B. Vosshall, Rockefeller University, USA
DEET and Beyond: Harnessing Insect Olfaction to Develop New Repellents

Richard Benton, University of Lausanne, Switzerland
Short Talk: Variant Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors as Chemosensory Receptors in Drosophila

Hubert Amrein, Duke University, USA
Short Talk: Sweet Taste Perception in Drosophila

Alain Trembleau, University Pierre & Marie Curie, France
Evidence for a Developmentally-Regulated Local Translation of Odorant Receptor mRNAs in Axons of Olfactory Sensory Neurons

Takeshi Imai, University of Tokyo, Japan
Short Talk: Pre-Target Axon-Axon Interactions Establish the Neural Map Topography

Xiaodong Li, Senomyx, Inc., USA
Short Talk: Molecular Mechanisms for Enhancement of T1R Taste Receptors

Dennis Drayna, NIDCD, National Institutes of Health, USA
Short Talk: Population-Specific Genetic Variants Control Human Sweet Taste Sensitivity

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Pre Function
11:15
On Own for Lunch

11:15—13:00
Poster Setup

Bay
13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Bay
16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Pre Function
17:00—19:30
Pain/Olfactory Circuits I
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Mountain
David Julius, University of California, San Francisco, USA
From Peppers to Peppermints: Natural Products as Probes of the Pain Pathway

Ardem Patapoutian, The Scripps Research Institute, USA
TRP Channels and Nociception

Joel D. Mainland, Duke University, USA
Short Talk: Cracking the Code: Translating Odorants into Olfactory Receptor Responses

Gilles J. Laurent, Max-Planck-Institute for Brain Research, Germany
Neural Coding of Olfactory Information

Rainer Friedrich, Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research, Switzerland
Transformation of Odor Representations in the Olfactory Bulb and Beyond

19:30—20:30
Dinner

Granhall
20:00—22:00
Poster Session 1

Bay
20:00—21:00
Social Hour

Bay

TUESDAY, MARCH 17

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Granhall
08:00—11:15
Olfactory Circuits II
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Mountain
Rachel Wilson, Harvard Medical School, USA
Olfactory Processing in the Drosophila Brain

Gero Miesenböck, University of Oxford, UK
Signals and Noise in Olfactory Circuits

Matt Wachowiak, Boston University, USA
Low-Level Mechanisms for Processing Odor Information in the Behaving Animal

Gary L. Westbrook, Oregon Health & Science University, USA
The Interplay between Chemical and Electrical Synapses in Olfactory Bulb Glomeruli

Haiqing Zhao, Johns Hopkins University, USA
Short Talk: ANO2, a Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel in Vertebrate Olfactory Transduction

Hartwig Spors, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Germany
Short Talk: In vivo Imaging of Mice with Genetically Labeled Glomeruli

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Pre Function
11:15
On Own for Lunch

11:15—13:00
Poster Setup

Bay
13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Bay
13:00—16:30
Workshop 2: 50 Years of Pheromone Research

Mountain
Tristram Wyatt, University of Oxford, UK
Pheromones at 50 - From Birth to Maturity

Marie-Christine Broillet, University of Lausanne, Switzerland
The Mouse Grueneberg Ganglion: A Danger Detector

Joerg Fleischer, Institute of Physiology, Germany
Short Talk: Grueneberg Ganglion – a Dual Sensory Organ?

Liming Sun, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, SIBS, CAS, China
Short Talk: Guanylyl Cyclase-D in the Olfactory CO2 Neurons is Activated by Bicarbonate

Kazushige Touhara, University of Tokyo, Japan
Chemosensory Receptor and Behavior

Darren W. Logan, The Scripps Research Institute, USA
Short Talk: Suckling is Promoted by Innate Conditioning via Non-Specialist Olfactory Circuits

Albert Folch, University of Washington, USA
Large-Scale Search for Pheromone-Specialist Olfactory Sensory Neurons using a Microfluidic Platform

Frank Zufall, University of Saarland, Germany
Sensory Adaptation in the Vomeronasal Organ

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Pre Function
17:00—19:00
Pheromone Processing
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Mountain
Lisa T. Stowers, The Scripps Research Institute, USA
Molecular Mechanisms of Pheromone Detection

Yoram Ben-Shaul, Harvard University, USA
The Mouse AOB: New Insights into Vomeronasal Chemosensory Processing

Hiroaki Matsunami, Duke University Medical Center, USA
Short Talk: Translating Odorants into Olfactory Receptor Responses

Ivanka Savic, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden
Visualizing Pheromone Perception in the Human Brain

Monika C. M. Frey, Universität Würzburg, Germany
Short Talk: Don´t Run Away! – A Human Pheromone as an Unconscious Safety Signal

Ivan Rodriguez, University of Geneva, Switzerland
V1R Monogenic Expression: Copycat or Unique Mechanism?

19:00—20:00
Dinner

Granhall
20:00—22:00
Poster Session 2

Bay
20:00—21:00
Social Hour

Bay

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Granhall
08:00—11:15
Behavior
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Mountain
Mario de Bono, University of Cambridge, UK
Evolutionary Sculpting of Foraging in C. elegans

Cornelia Bargmann, Rockefeller University, USA
Half a Wiring Diagram is Better than None: Generating Flexible Olfactory Behaviors from a Fixed Anatomy

David J. Anderson, California Institute of Technology, USA
Role of Chemosensation in the Regulation of Aggression in Drosophila

Zach Mainen, Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia, Portugal
Neural Mechanisms of Olfactory-Guided Decisions in Rodents

Julia L. Semmelhack, University of California, San Diego, USA
Short Talk: Select Glomeruli in the Drosophila Antennal Lobe Mediate Innate Olfactory Attraction and Aversion

Ron Congrong Yu, Stowers Institute for Medical Research, USA
Altered Odor Response and Discrimination in Mice with Multi Glomerular Maps

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Pre Function
11:15
On Own for Lunch

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Pre Function
17:00—18:20
Cortex and Beyond
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Mountain
Donald A. Wilson, Nathan Kline Institute and New York University School of Medicine, USA
Olfactory Cortical Processing

Edmund T. Rolls, Oxford Centre for Computational Neuroscience, UK
Multimodal Sensory Integration in and beyond the Orbitofrontal Cortex

Denise Chen, Rice University, USA
Short Talk: Encoding Human Sexual Chemosensory Cues in the Orbitofrontal and Fusiform Cortices

Markus Knaden, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Germany
Short Talk: Smell Stereo: How Desert Ants Take Olfactory Snapshots

19:00—19:30
Closing Lecture
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Mountain
Linda B. Buck, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, USA
Olfactory Mechanisms in Mammals

19:30—20:30
Social Hour

Alumni
20:00—21:00
Dinner

Granhall
20:00—23:00
Entertainment

Granhall

THURSDAY, MARCH 19

 
Departure


*Session Chair †Invited, not yet responded.



We gratefully acknowledge support for this conference from:


Directors' Fund


These generous unrestricted gifts allow our Directors to schedule meetings in a wide variety of important areas, many of which are in the early stages of research.

Click here to view all of the donors who support the Directors' Fund.



We gratefully acknowledge the generous grant for this conference provided by:


National Institutes of Health

Grant No. 1R13DC009937-01




We appreciate the organizations that provide Keystone Symposia with additional support, such as marketing and advertising:

Cell Press Royal Society of Chemistry

Special thanks to the following for their support of Keystone Symposia initiatives to increase participation at this meeting by scientists from underrepresented backgrounds:


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If your organization is interested in joining these entities in support of Keystone Symposia, please contact: Sarah Lavicka, Director of Development, Email: sarahl@keystonesymposia.org,
Phone:+1 970-262-2690

Click here for more information on Industry Support and Recognition Opportunities.

If you are interested in becoming an advertising/marketing in-kind partner, please contact:
Yvonne Psaila, Director, Marketing and Communications, Email: yvonnep@keystonesymposia.org,
Phone:+1 970-262-2676