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This meeting took place in 2010



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Structural Genomics: Expanding the Horizons of Structural Biology (J2)


Organizer(s) Ian A. Wilson, Kurt Wüthrich, Soichi Wakatsuki and Christine A. Orengo
January 8—13, 2010
Beaver Run Resort • Breckenridge, Colorado USA
Abstract Deadline: Sep 14, 2009
Late Abstract Deadline: Oct 12, 2009
Scholarship Deadline: Sep 14, 2009
Early Registration Deadline: Nov 9, 2009

Supported by The Directors' Fund

Joint Meeting: Structural Biology (J1)

Summary of Meeting:
Structural Biology continues to be one of the most prolific and informative ways to make biological and biomedical discoveries at the turn of the millennium, and provides fundamental molecular level insights into the underlying biological and biochemical functions. Structural genomics has been at the forefront of these developments as a major contributor to the advances of high throughput (HT) technologies and methodologies that span the gene to structure process by both crystallography and NMR. In parallel, the rapid expansion of the genome sequencing projects is substantially increasing the complexity and size of the known protein universe, and providing structural biologists with a wealth of new opportunities and challenges to explore, the diversity of biological macromolecules and their relationships to, function, evolution and disease. The goal of this Keystone Symposia meeting is to explore how we can best harness the current approaches from high throughput structural genomics to tackle present and future challenges in structural biology and how we can directly apply these methods to topical and important problems in structural, molecular, cellular and chemical biology. We will focus on approaches that are applicable not only for large consortia, but also for single investigator laboratories and smaller scale projects. Using such methodologies and technologies, we can then keep pace with the genome sequencing efforts and continue to make significant contributions to the constantly increasing discoveries on the intricacies and vagaries of complex biological processes – such as mammalian proteomes, microbial pathogens and cellular and signaling networks / systems. In this way, structural biology will continue to lead the way in making innovative discoveries in biological, chemical, and biomedical research.

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No registration fees are used to fund entertainment or alcohol at this conference

Conference Program    Print  |   View meeting in 12 hr (am/pm) time


FRIDAY, JANUARY 8

15:00—19:30
Registration

Foyer
18:15—19:15
Refreshments

Foyer
19:15—19:30
Orientation for New Attendees and New Investigators
Keystone Symposia's Chief Scientific Officer, Dr. Andy Robertson, to lead discussion in a "What to Expect during your Attendance" for interested delegates.

Peaks 1-5
19:30—20:30
Keynote Session (Joint)
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Peaks 1-5
* Ian A. Wilson, The Scripps Research Institute, USA

* Alasdair C. Steven, NIAMS, National Institutes of Health, USA

William E. Moerner, Stanford University, USA
Single-Molecule Approaches to Biomolecular Dynamics and Imaging of Cellular Superstructures


SATURDAY, JANUARY 9

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Summit Gallery
08:00—11:15
Pushing the Limits of Structural Biology I: New and Innovative Methods (Joint)
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Peaks 1-5
* Kurt Wüthrich, ETH Zürich, The Scripps Research Institute, Switzerland

Andrej Sali, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Integrative Determination of Macromolecular Structures

John A. Tainer, The Scripps Research Institute, USA
Short Talk: Proteomics Scale X-ray Solution Scattering (SAXS) to Shape Interactomes

Ad Bax, NIDDK, National Institutes of Health, USA
Combining Novel Solution NMR Approaches with SAXS

Wah Chiu, Baylor College of Medicine, USA
Seeing Protein Backbone and Side-Chains in Molecular Machines by Cryo-EM

Daniel J. Müller, ETH Zurich, Switzerland
Force Probing How Membrane Proteins Regulate Molecular Mechanics of Cell Rounding

Graham T. Johnson, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Short Talk: Automated Visualization of Subcellular Environments

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Foyer
11:15—13:00
Poster Setup

Breckenridge Ballroom
11:15
On Own for Lunch and Recreation

13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Breckenridge Ballroom
14:30—16:30
Workshop 1: Advances in Methodologies and Tools for Structural Biology
This workshop will focus on new methodologies, technologies, instrumentation, devices, software and innovations for production, characterization, structure determination and analysis of biological macromolecules, including servers, databases and repositories.

Peak 5
* Helen M. Berman, Rutgers University, Center for Proteomics Research, USA

* Andy May, Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, USA

George N. Phillips, Jr., University of Wisconsin, CESG, USA
Use of a Cell-Free Protein Production Platform for X-Ray Crystallography

Cory J. Gerdts, Protein BioSolutions, USA
Nanovolume Optimization of Protein Crystal Growth Using the Microcapillary Protein Crystallization System

Andrei Kouranov, Monsanto, USA
PepcDB (Protein Expression Purification Crystallization DataBase): A Tool for Experimental Design

Paolo Rossi, Rutgers University, USA
Synergies of X-ray, NMR, and Rosetta in Protein Structure Determination

Peter Minary, Stanford University, USA
Conformational Optimization with Natural Degrees of Freedom: A Novel Stochastic Chain Closure Algorithm and its Applications

Joshua M. Gilmore, Stowers Institute for Medical Research, USA
Determining Protein Complex Architecture using a Probabilistic Deletion Network Derived from Quantitative Proteomics

Gyorgy Babnigg, Argonne National Laboratory, USA
Comparison of High-Throughput Techniques for the Expression of Protein Complexes

Wladek Minor, University of Virginia, USA
Application of the Ligand Screening Module in HKL-3000 for High-Throughput Identification of Bound Ligands in Protein Crystal Structures

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Foyer
17:00—19:00
Advances in Protein and Nucleic Acid Production and Crystallization
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Peak 5
* Andrzej Joachimiak, Argonne National Laboratory, USA

Scott A. Lesley, Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation, USA
Applying Structural Genomics Principles to Biology-Centered Targets

Yaeta Endo, Ehime University, Japan
Advances in Cell Free Systems for Expression of Eukaryotic and Parasitic Proteins

Robert T. Batey, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA
Advances in Preparation and Crystallization of RNA

Joseph R. Luft, Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute, USA
Short Talk: The Use of Empirically Derived Detergent Phase Boundaries to Crystallize Membrane Proteins


Following Session is for Structural Biology (J1)

17:00—19:00
Macromolecular Complexes I
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Peaks 1-4
* Christopher P. Hill, University of Utah, USA

Eva Nogales, University of California, Berkeley, USA
Microtubule-Kinetochore Interactions

Cynthia Wolberger, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, USA
Insights into the Unusual Chemistry of Sir2 Enzymes

Justin L. P. Benesch, University of Oxford, UK
Short Talk: A Hybrid Approach for Determining the Structures of Protein Oligomers Comprising Heterogeneous Ensembles

Angela M. Gronenborn, University of Pittsburgh, USA
Synergy between cryo-EM and NMR - Novel Findings for HIV capsid Function

19:00—20:00
Social Hour with Lite Bites

Breckenridge Ballroom
19:30—22:00
Poster Session 1

Breckenridge Ballroom

SUNDAY, JANUARY 10

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Summit Gallery
08:00—11:15
Advances in Crystallography, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Computation
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Peak 5
* Robert M. Stroud, University of California, San Francisco, USA

Soichi Wakatsuki, KEK IMSS Photon Factory, Japan
Developments in Synchrotron Protein Crystallography for Targeted Structural Proteomics

Kurt Wüthrich, ETH Zürich, The Scripps Research Institute, Switzerland
NMR in Structural Genomics: New Strategic and Technical Challenges

John L. Markley, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA
Short Talk: Advances in High-Throughput NMR Spectroscopy of Proteins

Wayne A. Hendrickson, Columbia University, USA
Structural Genomics of Membrane Proteins by X-ray Crystallography

David Baker, University of Washington, USA
Rapid Structure Determination from Sparse Experimental Data Sets using Rosetta

Michael A. Kennedy, Miami University, USA
Short Talk: EPR-Based Long-Range Distance Restraints for Structure Determination of Protein Complexes


Following Session is for Structural Biology (J1)

08:00—11:00
Membrane-Associated Phenomena
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Peaks 1-4
* Hartmut Luecke, University of California, Irvine, USA

James H. Hurley, University of California, Berkeley, USA
The ESCRT Complexes in Membrane Scission and Budding

Christopher P. Arthur, FEI Co., USA
Short Talk: Structure of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype B in a Lipid Bilayer at Multiple pH Levels

Gabriel Waksman, Birkbeck College and University College London, UK
Structural Biology of Type IV Secretion Systems

Mark S.P. Sansom, University of Oxford, UK
Multiscale Simulations of Membrane Proteins

Jay T. Groves, University of California, Berkeley, USA
Spatial and Mechanical Regulation of Signal Transduction in Cell Membranes

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Foyer
11:15—13:00
Poster Setup

Breckenridge Ballroom
11:15
On Own for Lunch and Recreation

13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Breckenridge Ballroom
14:30—16:30
Workshop 2: Structural Genomics and Functional Proteomics of Biological Macromolecules
This workshop will focus on novel insights gained from study of the expanding protein universe, protein families, individual organisms, microbiomes, metagenomes, drug targets, pathogens, novel mechanisms, challenging proteins, including RNA, protein-protein complexes, membrane proteins and eukaryotic proteins.

Peak 5
* Gaetano Thomas Montelione, Rutgers University, USA

Marek Grabowski, University of Virginia, USA
“Drugability” of Structural Genomics

Parthasarathy Sampathkumar, Eli Lilly, USA
Structures of Two PHR Domains from Mus musculus Phr1 (Mycbp2) Reveal a Novel Fold and Provide Insights into a C. elegans RPM-1 Loss of Function Mutation

Werner Braun, University of Texas Medical Branch,, USA
Allergen Structures in a Genomic Age

Ashley M. Deacon, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, USA
Structural and Functional Studies of the Bacterial Ancestors of Common Eukaryotic Protein Modules

Liskin Swint-Kruse, University of Kansas Medical School, USA
Comparing the Functional Roles of Nonconserved Sequence Positions in Homologous Transcription Repressors: Implications for Sequence/Function Analyses

András Fiser, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, USA
Structural Characteristics of Novel Protein Folds

Markus Fischer, Columbia University, USA
MarkUs: A Server to Navigate Sequence-Structure-Function Space

Margaret J. Gabanyi, PSI Structural Biology Knowledgebase - Rutgers University, USA
The PSI Structural Genomics Knowledgebase Technology Portal - an Online Resource for all Structural Biologists

Andrew B. Ward, The Scripps Research Institute, USA
Structural Basis of Drug Binding and Transport in P-glycoprotein


Following Session is for Structural Biology (J1)

14:30—16:30
Special Session

Peaks 1-4
* Alasdair C. Steven, NIAMS, National Institutes of Health, USA

Vitold E. Galkin, University of Virginia, USA
Short Talk: High Resolution Structures of F-actin Yield New Insights into the Dynamics of Actin Filament

Christian Biertuempfel, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Germany
Short Talk: Crystal Structure of T4 Endonuclease VII Resolving a Holliday Junction

Pingwei Li, Texas A&M University, USA
Short Talk: The Structural Basis of Viral RNA Recognition by RIG-I

Mei-ting Wu, University of Washington, USA
Short Talk: Nanobodies were Crucial for Solving Crystal Structures from a Key Protein of an RNA-Editing Complex from the Sleeping Sickness Parasite Trypanosoma brucei

Donald L.D. Caspar, Florida State University, USA
Special Lecture: Origins of Structural Biology and Trials and Errors in its History

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Foyer
17:00—19:00
Challenging Proteins
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Peak 5
Robert M. Stroud, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Ratiocinative Screen of Eukaryotic Integral Membrane Protein Expression and Solubilization for Structure Determination

Raymond C. Stevens, University of Southern California, USA
Structure-Function of the Human G-Protein Coupled Receptor Family

Aled M. Edwards, University of Toronto, Canada
Advances in Structural Proteomics of Human Proteins

Boguslaw Nocek, Argonne National Laboratory, USA
Short Talk: Structure of the HK97-like Bacteriophage DNA Packaging Portal


Following Session is for Structural Biology (J1)

17:00—19:10
Unfolded, Alternatively Folded, and Deliberately Folded Proteins
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Peaks 1-4
* Mark R. Walter, University of Alabama, Birmingham, USA

Joel L. Sussman, Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel
Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs): A Role in Nervous System Development



Alasdair C. Steven, NIAMS, National Institutes of Health, USA
Amyloid Polymorphisms from Cryo-Electron Microscopy

Beat H. Meier, ETH Zürich, Switzerland
Amyloid and Prion Structure by Solid-State NMR: What Can We Learn?

Dorothee Kern, Brandeis University, HHMI, USA
Panorama of a Signaling Protein: Excursions in silico and in proteo

19:00—20:00
Social Hour with Lite Bites

Breckenridge Ballroom
19:30—22:00
Poster Session 2

Breckenridge Ballroom

MONDAY, JANUARY 11

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Summit Gallery
08:00—11:15
Pushing the Limits of Structural Biology II: Advances in Challenging Systems (Joint)
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Peaks 1-5
* Pamela J. Bjorkman, California Institute of Technology, USA

Steven C. Almo, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, USA
Sequence, Structure, Function, Immunity

Roger W. Hendrix, University of Pittsburgh, USA
The Virome and Evolutionary Relationships

Andrew B. Ward, The Scripps Research Institute, USA

Thomas Güttler, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Germany
Short Talk: Cargo Recognition by the Nuclear Export Receptor CRM1/Exportin1

Erik W. Debler, Rockefeller University, USA
Short Talk: Characterization of the Nup84 Complex - Paradigm for the Nuclear Pore Complex Structure

Jamie H.D. Cate, University of California, Berkeley, USA
Structures of the Bacterial Ribosome and the Mechanism of Translocation

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Foyer
11:15—13:00
Poster Setup

Breckenridge Ballroom
11:15
On Own for Lunch and Recreation

13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Breckenridge Ballroom
16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Foyer
17:00—18:30
Evolution of Structure and Function
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Peak 5
* Christine A. Orengo, University College London, UK

Ian A. Wilson, The Scripps Research Institute, USA
What have we Learned from Structural Genomics of Proteins of Unknown Function?

Michael Levitt, Stanford University, USA
The Protein Universe: A Current Snapshot

Barry Honig, Columbia University / HHMI, USA
Structural and Functional Relationships between Proteins with Different Global Topologies: Implications for Function Annotation Strategies


Following Session is for Structural Biology (J1)

17:00—19:00
Structural Biology of Prokaryotic Cells
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Peaks 1-4
* Elizabeth J. Goldsmith, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Dallas, USA

Natalie Strynadka, University of British Columbia, Canada
Piecing Together the Type III Secretion System of Pathogenic Bacteria

Grant J. Jensen, California Institute of Technology, USA
Bacterial Cryotomography

Clara L. Kielkopf, University of Rochester Center for RNA Biology, USA
Short Talk: Structural Mechanism of Prokaryotic NADH/NAD+ Redox Sensing

Ohad Medalia, Zurich University, Switzerland
Structural Insight into the Nuclear Pore Complex by Cryo-Electron Tomography

18:30—19:15
Debate 1: Protein Folds: Fact or Fiction??

* Ian A. Wilson, The Scripps Research Institute, USA

Barry Honig, Columbia University / HHMI, USA

Joel L. Sussman, Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel

Andrej Sali, University of California, San Francisco, USA

Michael Levitt, Stanford University, USA

Adam Godzik, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, USA

David Baker, University of Washington, USA

Christine A. Orengo, University College London, UK

19:15—20:00
Social Hour with Lite Bites

Breckenridge Ballroom
19:30—22:00
Large-Scale Poster Session: World-Wide Structural Genomics and Structural Proteomics Centers
Structural genomic, structural proteomic and protein production centers and consortia highlight the platforms they have developed on new methods, technologies, databases, and computational tools that have spearheaded advances in protein production and structure determination for all classes of targets from bacterial to pathogens to human and on challenging macromolecules, such as membrane proteins, eukaryotic proteins and protein-protein complexes. Emphasis will be placed on what is applicable to the entire community, including single investigator laboratories to increase success and throughput in the study of biological macromolecules. An additional focus of this session will be on contributions of structural genomics to the structure and function of biological macromolecules. Megaposters are encouraged for general overviews from large and medium-sized centers. Normal sized posters are encouraged on specific aspects of structural genomics and structural proteomics, including structural and functional contributions to the study of biological macromolecules.

Breckenridge Ballroom

TUESDAY, JANUARY 12

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Summit Gallery
08:00—11:00
Proteomics and Protein Assemblies/Networks
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Peak 5
* Soichi Wakatsuki, KEK IMSS Photon Factory, Japan

Christine A. Orengo, University College London, UK
Identifying Novel Genes Implicated in Function Networks of Biological and Medical Significance

Adam Godzik, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, USA
Structural View of the Gut Microbial Surface Proteome: Implications for Host Immunity and Health

Michael Washburn, Stowers Institute for Medical Research, USA
Quantitative and Probabilistic Assembly of Human Protein Interaction Networks

Janet Y. Huang, Rutgers University and Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, USA
Short Talk: Human Cancer Protein Interaction Network

Hannes Braberg, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Functional Insights from Protein-Protein and Genetic Interaction Maps


Following Session is for Structural Biology (J1)

08:00—11:15
Macromolecular Interactions
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Peaks 1-4
* Andrej Sali, University of California, San Francisco, USA

James A. Wells, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Trapping Allosteric Transitions in Enzymes

Pamela J. Bjorkman, California Institute of Technology, USA
Fc Receptors: From Molecules to Cells

Tanja Kortemme, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Prediction, Design and Engineering of Protein Interactions and Networks

Peter K. Kasson, University of Virginia, USA
Short Talk: Simulations Yield New Insight into the Mechanism of Viral Membrane Fusion

Gideon Schreiber, Weizmann Institute, Israel
Building a Forcefield for Protein Interface Design

Steffen Lindert, University of California, San Diego, USA
Short Talk: BCL::EM-Fold: Protein Folding Tool for Medium Resolution Density Maps

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Foyer
11:00
On Own for Lunch and Recreation

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Foyer
17:00—18:30
Exploiting Structure for Function
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Peak 5
* Wayne A. Hendrickson, Columbia University, USA

Nobutaka Hirokawa, University of Tokyo, Japan
Kinesin Superfamily Molecular Motors, KIFs and Intracellular Transport: Mechanism of Motility

Susan S. Taylor, University of California, San Diego, USA
Conserved Architecture and Assembly of an Active Protein Kinase

Peter J. Myler, Seattle Biomedical Research Institute, USA
Structural Genomics of Infectious Disease


Following Session is for Structural Biology (J1)

17:00—19:00
Macromolecular Complexes II
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Peaks 1-4
* R. Andrew Byrd, NCI, National Institutes of Health, USA

Albert J.R. Heck, Utrecht University, Netherlands
Native Mass Spectrometry Applied to Virus Structure and Assembly

John (Jack) E. Johnson, The Scripps Research Institute, USA
Biophysical Studies of Virus Particles and their Maturation: Insights into Elegantly Programmed Nano-Machines

G. Marius Clore, NIDDK, National Institutes of Health, USA
Short Talk: Detecting and Visualizing Sparsely Populated Protein States

Richard W. Kriwacki, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, USA
Short Talk: PUMA-Induced Dimerization of BCL-xL Releases Cytoplasmic p53 and Promotes p53-Dependent Apoptosis

18:30—19:15
Debate 2: Can We Really Determine Function from Structure?

* Ian A. Wilson, The Scripps Research Institute, USA

Steven C. Almo, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, USA

* Stephen K. Burley, Rutgers University, USA

Aled M. Edwards, University of Toronto, Canada

Andrzej Joachimiak, Argonne National Laboratory, USA

Christine A. Orengo, University College London, UK

Gaetano Thomas Montelione, Rutgers University, USA

Susan S. Taylor, University of California, San Diego, USA

19:15—20:00
Social Hour with Lite Bites

Breckenridge Ballroom
20:00—23:00
Entertainment

Breckenridge Ballroom

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13

 
Departure


*Session Chair †Invited, not yet responded.



We gratefully acknowledge support for this conference from:


Directors' Fund


These generous unrestricted gifts allow our Directors to schedule meetings in a wide variety of important areas, many of which are in the early stages of research.

Click here to view all of the donors who support the Directors' Fund.



We gratefully acknowledge the generous grant for this conference provided by:


National Institutes of Health

Grant No. 1R13GM088949-01




We gratefully acknowledge additional support for this conference from:

Bruker BioSpin  GmbH Emerald BioSystems, Inc.
Structural Genomics Consortium
 

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Special thanks to the following for their support of Keystone Symposia initiatives to increase participation at this meeting by scientists from underrepresented backgrounds:


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Phone:+1 970-262-2690

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