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This meeting took place in 2010


Here are the related meetings in 2018:
Therapeutic Targeting of Hypoxia-Sensitive Pathways (V1)

For a complete list of the meetings for the upcoming/current season, see our meeting list, or search for a meeting.

Hypoxia: Molecular Mechanisms of Oxygen Sensing and Response Pathways (B1)


Organizer(s) Navdeep S. Chandel, Peter J. Ratcliffe, Volker H. Haase and Agnes Görlach
January 19—24, 2010
Keystone Resort • Keystone, Colorado USA
Abstract Deadline: Sep 21, 2009
Late Abstract Deadline: Oct 22, 2009
Scholarship Deadline: Sep 21, 2009
Early Registration Deadline: Nov 19, 2009

Supported by The Directors' Fund

Summary of Meeting:
Molecular oxygen is absolutely essential for cellular respiration and higher organisms have developed sophisticated physiological responses that allow adaptation to a low oxygen environment. These include neurotransmitter release from the carotid body to increase respiration; pulmonary vascular constriction to redirect blood flow from poorly to well oxygenated regions; and in the kidney, enhanced erythropoietin secretion to boost red blood cell production to augment oxygen carrying capacity. Tissue hypoxia is not only associated with a variety of pathological conditions such as pulmonary, cardiovascular and neoplastic diseases, but also occurs during normal embryonic development and plays an important role in stem cell maintenance. This meeting will highlight the latest, cutting-edge advances in hypoxia research and discuss (1) the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie physiological responses to hypoxia, (2) the role of hypoxic signaling in the pathogenesis and progression of pulmonary hypertension, ischemia and cancer, (3) the importance of hypoxia in stem cell maintenance and embryonic development, and (4) the overall state of the art in hypoxic signaling in inflammation and metabolism.

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Conference Program    Print  |   View meeting in 12 hr (am/pm) time


TUESDAY, JANUARY 19

15:00—19:30
Registration

Longs Peak Foyer
18:30—19:30
Refreshments

Longs Peak Foyer
19:30—20:30
Keynote Address
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Grays/Longs Peaks
Gregg L. Semenza, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, USA
Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Responses to Hypoxia


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Quandary Peak
08:00—11:15
Biology of Hypoxia Signaling
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Grays/Longs Peaks
Volker H. Haase, Vanderbilt University, USA
Pathophysiological Consequences of Chronic HIF Activation

Peter F. Carmeliet, University of Leuven, VIB, Belgium
Genetic Analyses of Prolyl Hydroxylases in Mice

* Peter J. Ratcliffe, University of Oxford, UK
Protein Hydroxylation and the Signaling of Hypoxia

Joel I. Perez-Perri, Instituto Leloir, Argentina
Short Talk: Drosophila Genome-Wide RNAi Screen Identifies Multiple Regulators of HIF Dependent Transcription in Hypoxia

Peter J. Espenshade, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, USA
Short Talk: Oxygen-Regulated Degradation of Yeast SREBP by a Candidate Prolyl Hydroxylase

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Longs Peak Foyer
11:15
On Own for Lunch and Recreation

11:15—13:00
Poster Setup

Quandary Peak
13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Quandary Peak
14:30—16:30
Workshop 1: Graduate Students/PostDoc Symposium

Grays/Longs Peaks
* Volker H. Haase, Vanderbilt University, USA

David Hoogewijs, University of Fribourg, Switzerland
A Zinc Finger and BTB Domain-Containing Protein as a Novel PHD Interactor

Sarah Linke, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden
The LL-Motif in HIF-alpha Contributes to FIH-1 Binding

Heidi Menrad, Goethe-University Frankfurt, Germany
Divergent Roles of HIF-1alpha vs. HIF-2alpha in the Survival of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

Zhizhong Li, Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation, USA
Hypoxic Microenvironment and Hypoxia-Inducible Factors Regulate Tumorigenic Capacity of Glioma Stem Cells

Kevin Rouault, INSERM, France
HIF-1a and -2a Knockdown Induced Deficiency in the Long-Term Reconstitution Ability of Human Haematopoietic Cells

Kate M. Harms, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, USA
Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells Display a Glycolytic Metabolic Phenotype Under Non-Hypoxic Conditions: Role of Constitutive Stabilization of Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha)

Carissa L. Perez, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, USA
Exposure to Hypoxic Environments Results in Elevated de novo Fatty Acid Synthesis as Revealed by a 13C Isotope Labeling Strategy

Federico Formenti, University of Oxford, UK
Chuvash Polycythaemia Demonstrates the Importance of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor in Human Skeletal Muscle Metabolism

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Longs Peak Foyer
17:00—19:15
Pulmonary Responses to Hypoxia
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Grays/Longs Peaks
* Paul T. Schumacker, Northwestern University, USA

Karen M. Ridge, Northwestern University, USA
Cytoskeletal Rearrangements in Lung Cells during Hypoxia

Larrisa A. Shimoda, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, USA
HIF-1 and Pulmonary Responses to Hypoxia

Marlene Rabinovitch, Stanford University, USA
Dysregulated Wnt-PPARgamma Interactions in Pulmonary Vascular Pathology

Gregory B. Waypa, Northwestern University, USA
Short Talk: Hypoxia Triggers Subcellular Compartmental Redox Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

Friederike C. Weisel, University of Giessen Lung Center (UGLC), Germany
Short Talk: Reverse Remodeling in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

19:15—20:15
Social Hour with Lite Bites

Quandary Peak
19:30—22:00
Poster Session 1

Quandary Peak

THURSDAY, JANUARY 21

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Quandary Peak
08:00—11:15
Cancer
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Grays/Longs Peaks
* William G. Kaelin, Jr., Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, USA
Dioxygenases as Therapeutic Targets in Cancer

Patrick H. Maxwell, Rayne Institute, UK
The HIF/PHD/VHLAxis in Kidney Cancer

Tricia M. Wright, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA
Short Talk: Ror2 is a Non-Hypoxia HIF Target of VHL Inactivation in Renal Cell Carcinoma

Giovanni Melillo, Immuno-Oncology at AstraZeneca, USA
Targeting Hypoxic Cell Signaling for Cancer Therapy

Leisa K. Johnson, Genentech, Inc., USA
Interrogating alpha-VEGF responses in genetically engineered mouse models of oncology

Luciana P. Schwab, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, USA
Short Talk: HIF-1alpha Promotes Primary Tumor Growth, Lung Macrometastasis and Stem Cell Activity in the MMTV-PyMT Model of Luminal Breast Cancer

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Longs Peak Foyer
11:15
On Own for Lunch and Recreation

11:15—13:00
Poster Setup

Quandary Peak
13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Quandary Peak
16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Longs Peak Foyer
17:00—19:15
Acute Responses to Hypoxia
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Grays/Longs Peaks
* Nanduri R. Prabhakar, University of Chicago, USA
Acute Hypoxic Sensing and Reactive Oxygen Species

Joseph A. Garcia, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA
Intersections of Stress-Responsive Signal Transduction Pathways

Gabriel G. Haddad, University of California, San Diego, USA
Adaptive responses to hypoxia: Insights from a genetic model

Vikram Sudarsan, Stanford University, USA
Short Talk: Acute Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Sensing in a Drosophila Respiratory Neural Circuit

Mark R. Band, University of Illinois, USA
Short Talk: Evolution of the p53 Pathway in the Hypoxia Tolerant Mole-Rat Mimics a Cancer Survival Mechanism

19:15—20:15
Social Hour with Lite Bites

Quandary Peak
19:30—22:00
Poster Session 2

Quandary Peak

FRIDAY, JANUARY 22

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Quandary Peak
08:00—11:15
Stem Cells and Hypoxia
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Grays/Longs Peaks
* M. Celeste Simon, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Hypoxia and Stem Cells

Toshio Suda, Keio University, Japan
Hematopoietic Stem Cell in Hypoxic Niche

Emin Maltepe, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Oxygen, Mitochondria and Stem Cell Fate in the Placenta

Lorenz Poellinger, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden
Hypoxia Signaling of Notch

Till Acker, University of Giessen, Germany
Short Talk: A Hypoxic Niche Regulates Glioma Stem Cells

Ernestina Schipani, University of Michigan, USA
Short Talk: Dual Action of Von Hippel Lindau Protein (pVHL) in Limb Bud Mesenchyme

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Longs Peak Foyer
11:15
On Own for Lunch and Recreation

11:15—13:00
Poster Setup

Quandary Peak
13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Quandary Peak
14:30—16:30
Workshop 2: Therapeutics

Grays/Longs Peaks
* Amato J. Giaccia, Stanford University, USA

Matthew R. Pawlus, University of Colorado Denver, USA
USF2 is a HIF2 Specific Co-transcriptional Activator

Sven Påhlman, Lund University, Sweden
HIF-2alpha is a Negative Prognostic Marker in Human Neuroblastoma and Maintains Stemness in Neural Crest-like Neuroblastoma Tumor-Initiating Cells

William Y. Kim, University of North Carolina, USA
HIF2alpha Cooperates with RAS Activation to Promote Lung Cancer Progression

Hilda Mujcic, Ontario Cancer Institute, Canada
Hypoxic Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) Induces Expression of the Metastasis-Associated Gene LAMP3

Stilla Frede, University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany
Acute Hypoxia Induces HIF-1 Independent Monocyte Adhesion to Endothelial Cells through Increased ICAM-1 Expression

Isabelle Ader, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, France
Neutralization of Exogenous Sphingosine 1-Phosphate by Therapeutic Antibody Strategy Inhibits Hypoxia in vitro and Animal Models

Peppi Koivunen, University of Oulu, Finland
Hearts of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase-2 Hypomorphic Mice Show Protection Against Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

Dana L. Miller, University of Washington, USA
Hydrogen Sulfide Protects against Hypoxia in C. elegans

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Longs Peak Foyer
17:00—19:15
Inflammation
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Grays/Longs Peaks
* Agnes Görlach, German Heart Center Munich, Germany
ROS and HIF Crosstalk

Sean P. Colgan, University of Colorado Denver, USA
The Interplay of Hypoxia and Mucosal Inflammation

Cormac Taylor, University College Dublin, Ireland
Short Talk: Loss of Prolyl Hydroxylase-1 (PHD-1) is Protective in a Murine Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Gabriele A.I. Bergers, University of California, San Francisco, USA
HIF Induces Influx of Intratumoral Bone Marrow Derived Cells to Drive Neovascularization

Thorsten Cramer, RWTH Aachen University, Germany
Short Talk: Dual Role of HIF-1alpha in the Pathogenesis of Inflammation-Associated Cancer

19:15—20:15
Social Hour with Lite Bites

Quandary Peak
19:30—22:00
Poster Session 3

Quandary Peak

SATURDAY, JANUARY 23

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Quandary Peak
08:00—11:15
Metabolism
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Grays/Longs Peaks
* Christopher J. Schofield, University of Oxford, UK
Iron- and 2-Oxoglutarate-Dependent Dioxygenases

Tak W. Mak, Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer, Canada
Fatty Acid Oxidation and Survival of Cancer Cells

Navdeep S. Chandel, Northwestern University, USA
Mitochondrial Complex III Regulates Signaling

Siegfried Hekimi, McGill University, Canada
Short Talk: Mitochondrial ROS Increases HIF-1alpha Expression and Enhance the Immune Response in Long-Lived Mclk1+/- Mutant Mice

Lewis C. Cantley, Weill Cornell Medicine, USA
PI-3Kinase and cancer metabolism

Luis del Peso, Universidad Autonoma, Spain
Short Talk: Hypoxia Promotes Glycogen Accumulation through Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF)-Mediated Induction of Glycogen Synthase 1

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Longs Peak Foyer
11:15
On Own for Lunch and Recreation

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Longs Peak Foyer
17:00—19:15
Stress Responses to Hypoxia
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Grays/Longs Peaks
Thomas Kietzmann, University of Oulu, Finland
Signalling Cross-Talk between Hypoxia and Insulin

* L. Eric Huang, University of Utah, USA
HIF-1alpha, Genetic Alteration, and Tumor Progression

Amato J. Giaccia, Stanford University, USA
Stress Responses Induced by Hypoxia that Modulate Tumor Progression

Tobias Eckle, University of Colorado Denver, USA
Short Talk: Adenosine-Dependant Stabilization of Period 2 Promotes Metabolic Adaptation of the Myocardium to Limited Oxygen Availability

Lisa Heiserich, Beatson Institute for Cancer Research, UK
Short Talk: PHD3 Activity Regulates Hypoxia-Induced Actin Cytoskeleton Rearrangement and Cell Migration

19:15—20:15
Social Hour with Lite Bites

Quandary Peak
20:00—23:00
Entertainment

Quandary Peak

SUNDAY, JANUARY 24

 
Departure


*Session Chair †Invited, not yet responded.



We gratefully acknowledge support for this conference from:


Directors' Fund


These generous unrestricted gifts allow our Directors to schedule meetings in a wide variety of important areas, many of which are in the early stages of research.

Click here to view all of the donors who support the Directors' Fund.



We gratefully acknowledge the generous grant for this conference provided by:


National Institutes of Health

Grant No. 1R13HL097559-01




We gratefully acknowledge additional support for this conference from:

HypOxygen Ruskinn Technology Ltd, a division of the Baker Company, Inc.

We gratefully acknowledge additional in-kind support for this conference from those foregoing speaker expense reimbursements:



Genentech, Inc.


We appreciate the organizations that provide Keystone Symposia with additional support, such as marketing and advertising:


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Special thanks to the following for their support of Keystone Symposia initiatives to increase participation at this meeting by scientists from underrepresented backgrounds:


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If your organization is interested in joining these entities in support of Keystone Symposia, please contact: Sarah Lavicka, Director of Development, Email: sarahl@keystonesymposia.org,
Phone:+1 970-262-2690

Click here for more information on Industry Support and Recognition Opportunities.

If you are interested in becoming an advertising/marketing in-kind partner, please contact:
Yvonne Psaila, Director, Marketing and Communications, Email: yvonnep@keystonesymposia.org,
Phone:+1 970-262-2676