Granlibakken Tahoe Floorplan

Registered Attendees


Registered attendees (and speakers, organizers, etc.) will have access to the following items from their Account page:

  • Abstracts from speakers and poster sessions, including the joint meeting abstracts, available 30 days prior to the meeting (You can edit your own abstract from My Account page as well)

    NOTE: Abstract authors/submitters may choose to not have their abstract available online and in the secure mobile app until a week before the meeting.

  • Full participant list, including joint meeting participants
  • Printable Invoices and Invitation Letters
  • Scholarship Information
  • Lodging Information

Login to My Account page

This meeting took place in 2011



For a complete list of the meetings for the upcoming/current season, see our meeting list, or search for a meeting.

Extracellular Matrix and Cardiovascular Remodeling (B2)


Organizer(s) Merry L. Lindsey and Thomas K. Borg
January 23—28, 2011
Granlibakken Tahoe • Tahoe City, California USA
Abstract Deadline: Sep 23, 2010
Late Abstract Deadline: Oct 26, 2010
Scholarship Deadline: Sep 23, 2010
Early Registration Deadline: Nov 23, 2010

Supported by the Directors’ Fund

Summary of Meeting:
In response to normal growth as well as a variety of pathophysiological signals, the cardiovascular system undergoes a series of structural and functional adaptations, collectively known as remodeling, that are directed responses to both the initial stimulus and to feed-forward changes that result from the precipitating event. Remodeling is driven by the extracellular matrix (ECM) environment, in terms of altered ECM levels, composition, and function. The purpose of this meeting is to bring together researchers, clinicians, and pharmaceutical industry representatives to 1) focus on controversies and knowledge gaps that still prevent or limit therapeutic translation; 2) borrow from other fields (particularly cancer and skin wound healing) to gain insight into ECM functions; and 3) to offer direction and stimulate progress in cardiovascular ECM research.

View Scholarships/Awards
No registration fees are used to fund entertainment or alcohol at this conference

Conference Program    Print  |   View meeting in 12 hr (am/pm) time


SUNDAY, JANUARY 23

15:00—19:30
Registration

Pre Function
19:15—20:30
Welcoming Remarks and Keynote Address
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Mountain/Lake
* Merry L. Lindsey, University of Mississippi Medical Center, USA

Georg Ertl, Universitätsklinikum Würzburg, Germany
The Concept of Cardiac Wound Healing


MONDAY, JANUARY 24

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Granhall
08:00—11:15
What are the Dynamics and Functional Consequences of ECM in Growth and Injury?
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.
Using ECM changes to define mechanisms, versus using matrix changes as observational study end points, will provide direct translational applications for ECM targets. Proteolytic activity in the ECM involves a cascade of activities that can release and activate latent regulatory molecules such as growth factors, produce matrikines that stimulate cell signaling, and modify the environment to permit the cell growth and functional changes for a variety of cell types (e.g., myocytes, endothelial cells, fibroblasts). Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) appear to play a potentially significant role in this cascade by regulating ECM signaling, but is this only because MMPs are more studied than other protease families?

Mountain/Lake
* Georg Ertl, Universitätsklinikum Würzburg, Germany

* Merry L. Lindsey, University of Mississippi Medical Center, USA

Thomas K. Borg, Medical University of South Carolina, USA
Dynamics of ECM Turnover

Neil A. Turner, University of Leeds, UK
Cardiac Fibroblast Roles in ECM Turnover

W. Matthijs Blankesteijn, Maastricht University, Netherlands
Short Talk: Increased Myofibroblast Numbers in the Infarct Area can Prevent Ventricular Dilatation after Infarction

George E. Davis, University of Missouri School of Medicine, USA
ECM Remodeling Events Controlling Vascular Morphogenesis

Anne A. Knowlton, University of California, Davis, USA
Estrogen, Aging and the Extracellular Matrix

Perla Ayala, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Short Talk: Polymer Microstructures Influence Extracellular Matrix Remodeling in vitro and in vivo

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Pre Function
11:15—13:00
Poster Setup

Bay
13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Bay
11:15
On Own for Lunch and Recreation

14:30—16:30
Workshop 1: Small Group Meeting with Trainees
The organizers of this Keystone Symposia meeting plan to designate two hours this afternoon for speakers to meet with graduate students, post doctoral fellows and junior faculty to discuss a variety of topics including grant writing and avenues to find support, faculty positions (how to get one and how to thrive in one), how to maximize efficiency (turning a grant introduction into a review article), peer mentoring, etc.

Mountain/Lake
16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Pre Function
17:00—19:00
Variety of ECM Components: What Do They All Do? Part I
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.
In remodeling as well as growth, many ECM components serve as substrates for various proteases. While the best investigated protease family has been the MMPs, a complete spatiotemporal profile of MMP changes during disease progression and a full catalogue of MMP substrates processed during disease progression have not been documented. MMP processing of substrate is an initial event, and fluctuation in various signaling events caused by differences in substrate availability affect downstream function of fibroblasts, myocytes and vasculature, in addition to inflammatory cells in certain cases. Regulation at the level of the substrate provides spatial and temporal regulation of MMP activity. We still, however, do not have a good sense of whether primary MMP roles in cardiovascular remodeling occur through ECM or non-ECM substrate processing. Cooperation between the parenchyma, vasculature and mesenchymal cells is critical but what are the signals involved in this communication?

Mountain/Lake
* Thomas K. Borg, Medical University of South Carolina, USA

* W. Matthijs Blankesteijn, Maastricht University, Netherlands

Troy A. Baudino, Texas A&M Health Science Center, USA
The Extracellular Matrix; Where Does It Come From?

Patrick Collier, University College, Dublin Conway Institute, Ireland
Short Talk: Biomechanical Properties of Major Collagen Fiber Subtypes 1 & 3 in Human Myocardial Tissue

Amy D. Bradshaw, Medical University of South Carolina, USA
The Role of SPARC in Cardiac Hypertrophy: A Matricellular Regulator of Cardiac Collagen

J. Gary Meszaros, Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy, USA
Type VI Collagen Alters Cardiac Fibroblast Function and Post-MI Remodeling

19:00—20:00
Dinner

Granhall
20:00—22:00
Poster Session 1

Bay
20:00—21:00
Social Hour

Bay

TUESDAY, JANUARY 25

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Granhall
08:00—11:15
Variety of ECM Components: What Do They All Do? Part II
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Mountain/Lake
* Troy A. Baudino, Texas A&M Health Science Center, USA

* J. Gary Meszaros, Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy, USA

Krishna Singh, East Tennessee State University, USA
Osteopontin: Role in Extracellular Matrix Deposition and Mycocardial Remodeling

Kevin J. McCarthy, Louisiana State University Health Science Center, USA
Basement Membrane Integrity: A Molecular Genetic Approach to Probing Structure and Function

Bridget Leonard, University of Auckland, New Zealand
Short Talk: Does this Collagen Make My Heart Look Big? Quantifying Regional Cardiac Function and Collagen Organization following Myocardial Infarction

Edie C. Goldsmith, University of South Carolina, USA
Short Talk: Using Gold Nanorods to Modulate Cardiac Fibroblast Behavior and the Mechanical Properties of Collagen Matrices

Pamela A. Lucchesi, Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, USA
Extracellular Matrix Remodeling during the Progression of Volume Overload-Induced Heart Failure

Jeffrey W. Holmes, University of Virginia, USA
Contribution of Extracellular Matrix to the Mechanical Properties of the Heart

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Pre Function
11:15—13:00
Poster Setup

Bay
13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Bay
11:15
On Own for Lunch and Recreation

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Pre Function
17:00—19:00
What are the Roles of Proteases in Growth and Injury of the Myocardium?
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.
A variety of proteases and their inhibitors are involved in the normal turnover of ECM components in normal growth as well as in injury. These proteases include serine proteases uPA and tPA, the matrix metalloproteases MMPs) and ADAMS. Most studies have focused on the MMPs yet the dynamics (interactions) of the various proteases appears to be important in the sequence of response to injury. In addition, while a multitude of studies monitor MMP levels during the development of cardiovascular disease, few highlight that MMP regulation of ECM is a cascade that involves MMPs as an input to the system and not merely a read-out parameter. Can we use cancer models to guide cardiovascular research? TIMP roles and other protease inhibitors also need further evaluation. Pro-TIMP-1 binds pro-MMP-9 and prevents MMP-9 homodimerization and prevents cell migration without MMP activation, which suggests pro-MMP-9 is not merely a pre-active enzyme. In addition, several TIMPs have activities apart of MMP inhibition, including growth factor roles. Given that so many MMPs increase during injury and pathology, whether the primary level of regulation of net ECM turnover occurs at the level of the TIMPs has not been examined.

Mountain/Lake
* Pamela A. Lucchesi, Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, USA

* Bridget Leonard, University of Auckland, New Zealand

Ren-Ke Li, Toronto General Hospital, Canada
Cell and Gene Therapy Preserves Matrix Homeostasis: A Novel Paracrine Mechanism Preventing Detrimental Myocardial Matrix Modulation

Rolf K. Reed, University of Bergen, Norway
Connective Tissue Remodeling: Role of Edena and Fluid Dynamics

David G. Greenhouse, New York University School of Medicine, USA
Short Talk: Mitral Valve Prolapse is Associated with Altered Extracellular Matrix Gene Expression

Daisuke Yamamoto, Osaka Medical College, Japan
ACE Inhibitors Block MMP-9 Activity: New Tricks for Old Dogs

19:00—20:00
Dinner

Granhall
20:00—22:00
Poster Session 2

Bay
20:00—21:00
Social Hour

Bay

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Granhall
08:00—11:15
Is Inflammation a Key Component Here? Part I
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.
Inflammation is a carefully controlled set of reactions that involves a wide variety of cellular and ECM events. This topic will investigate how inflammatory components such as cytokines and chemokines regulate ECM responses.

Mountain/Lake
* Edie C. Goldsmith, University of South Carolina, USA

Dirk Westermann, Charité–Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany
Immunomodulation and Matrix Metalloproteinases in Viral Myocarditis

* Rolf K. Reed, University of Bergen, Norway

Suresh C. Tyagi, University of Louisville School of Medicine, USA
Juxtacrine Endothelial Myocyte Matrix in Cardiac Remodeling: A Translational Approach & H2S as Cardioprotection

Linus Malm, Umea University, Sweden
Short Talk: Size Determination of Hyaluronan using DLS and GEMMA

Sandra B. Haudek, Baylor College of Medicine, USA
Cardiac Fibroblast Precursor Cell Differentiation

Helene Skjøt-Arkil, Nordic Bioscience, Denmark
Short Talk: Human Macrophage Foam Cells Generate a Specific Proteolytic Fragment of CRP - A Novel Method for Evaluation of Macrophage Foam Cell Activity

Yan Ni, Merck & Co., Inc., USA
Extracellular Matrix Protein as Biomarker for Cardiac Remodeling: From a Drug Development View

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Pre Function
11:15—13:00
Poster Setup

Bay
13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Bay
11:15
On Own for Lunch and Recreation

14:30—16:30
Workshop 2: Small Group Meeting with Trainees
The organizers of this Keystone Symposia meeting plan to designate two hours this afternoon for speakers to meet with graduate students, post doctoral fellows and junior faculty to discuss a variety of topics including grant writing and avenues to find support, faculty positions (how to get one and how to thrive in one), how to maximize efficiency (turning a grant introduction into a review article), peer mentoring, etc.

Mountain/Lake
16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Pre Function
17:00—19:00
Is Inflammation a Key Component Here? Part II
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Mountain/Lake
* Sandra B. Haudek, Baylor College of Medicine, USA

* Dirk Westermann, Charité–Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany

Ferdinando Mannello, University Carlo Bo of Urbino, Italy
Cross-Talk between Matrix Metalloproteinases and Glycosaminoglycans in Vascular Remodeling: Who Rules Who?

Marielle Scherrer-Crosbie, Massachusetts General Hospital, USA
Ventricular Remodeling and Function: Insights using Mouse Echocardiography.

Stephanie Feldman Majkut, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Short Talk: Elasticity of Developing Cardiac Tissue and its Influence on Early Cardiomyocyte Beating

Yufang Jin, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA
Modeling and Analysis of Left Ventricular Remodeling: Integration of Experimental and Computational Approaches

19:00—20:00
Dinner

Granhall
20:00—22:00
Poster Session 3

Bay
20:00—21:00
Social Hour

Bay

THURSDAY, JANUARY 27

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Granhall
08:00—11:15
New Strategies for Therapeutic Intervention and Emerging Technologies that will Help us Sort Out these Issues
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Mountain/Lake
* Marielle Scherrer-Crosbie, Massachusetts General Hospital, USA

* Yufang Jin, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA

Robert G. Gourdie, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, USA
Lessons from Skin Healing for Cardiac Arrhythmia Therapies

Jennifer E. Van Eyk, Johns Hopkins University, USA
Developing Proteomic Technologies for the Study of Cell Environment Interaction

David R. Bush, University of Arizona, USA
Short Talk: Quantitation of Pyridinoline and Desmosine Crosslinks from Aorta and Heart by LC/MS/MS

Merry L. Lindsey, University of Mississippi Medical Center, USA
Using ECM-Specific Microarrays and Proteomics to Gain Insight into Cardiac Remodeling Post-Myocardial Infarction

Ulrike Mende, Rhode Island Hospital/Brown University, USA
Short Talk: Using a Novel Three-Dimensional Culture Model to Study Heart Cells

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Pre Function
11:15
On Own for Lunch and Recreation

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Pre Function
17:00—19:00
How do Other Organs Regulate ECM in the Heart?
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.
Since the heart is intimately connected to the kidney and brain, these organs play a profound influence on remodeling, as evidenced by angiotensin roles. The role of fluid dynamics as a critical event to dilute ECM components and provide physiological feedback to the vasculature through stretch mechanisms has not been fully investigated.

Mountain/Lake
* Robert G. Gourdie, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, USA

* Ulrike Mende, Rhode Island Hospital/Brown University, USA

Harry (Hal) C. Dietz, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, USA
Dissection of a Modifier Network Informs the Pathogenesis and Treatment of Marfan Syndrome

Stephanie Lehoux, McGill University - Jewish General Hospital, Canada
Extracellular Matrix Alterations in Vascular Remodeling

Jan H. N. Lindeman, Leids Universitair Medisch Centre, Netherlands
Short Talk: Distinct Defects in Collagen Micro-Architecture Underlie Vessel Wall Failure in Advanced Abdominal Aneurysms and Aneurysms in Marfan Syndrome

Kenneth Baker, Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, USA
Intracellular Renin-Angiotensin System: Implications on ECM in Diabetic Models

19:00—19:15
Concluding Remarks
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Mountain/Lake
* Merry L. Lindsey, University of Mississippi Medical Center, USA

* Thomas K. Borg, Medical University of South Carolina, USA

19:15—20:15
Social Hour

Alumni
20:00—21:00
Dinner

Granhall
20:00—23:00
Entertainment

Granhall

FRIDAY, JANUARY 28

 
Departure


*Session Chair †Invited, not yet responded.



We gratefully acknowledge support for this conference from:


Directors' Fund


These generous unrestricted gifts allow our Directors to schedule meetings in a wide variety of important areas, many of which are in the early stages of research.

Click here to view all of the donors who support the Directors' Fund.



We gratefully acknowledge the generous grant for this conference provided by:


National Institutes of Health

Grant No. 1R13HL104797-01




We gratefully acknowledge additional support for this conference from:


Hatteras Instruments, Inc.


Kent Scientific Corporation


We appreciate the organizations that provide Keystone Symposia with additional support, such as marketing and advertising:

Extracellular Matrix News

Special thanks to the following for their support of Keystone Symposia initiatives to increase participation at this meeting by scientists from underrepresented backgrounds:


Click here to view more of these organizations


If your organization is interested in joining these entities in support of Keystone Symposia, please contact: Sarah Lavicka, Director of Development, Email: sarahl@keystonesymposia.org,
Phone:+1 970-262-2690

Click here for more information on Industry Support and Recognition Opportunities.

If you are interested in becoming an advertising/marketing in-kind partner, please contact:
Yvonne Psaila, Director, Marketing and Communications, Email: yvonnep@keystonesymposia.org,
Phone:+1 970-262-2676