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This meeting took place in 2012



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Structural Biology of Cellular Processes: From Atoms to Cells (J6)


Organizer(s) Steven C. Almo, Anna Marie Pyle and Wah Chiu
January 22—27, 2012
Keystone Resort • Keystone, Colorado USA
Abstract Deadline: Sep 22, 2011
Late Abstract Deadline: Oct 25, 2011
Scholarship Deadline: Sep 22, 2011
Early Registration Deadline: Nov 22, 2011

Supported by the Directors’ Fund


Summary of Meeting:
Cellular function requires the spatial and temporal coordination of complex processes over a remarkable range of length and time scales. Structural biology — including X-ray, EM and NMR approaches — has been instrumental in contributing to our mechanistic understanding of catalysis, molecular recognition and regulation, as well as in providing unique insights into modulating these processes to support therapeutic intervention. As these structural approaches have continued to mature, they have moved out of the realm of the specialist and are now an essential and indispensible part of modern biological discovery. The future promise of structural biology rests on our ability to integrate atomic resolution knowledge with results derived from cutting-edge microscopies and spectroscopies, as well as complementary genetic, biochemical and chemical biological methodologies. This symposium will highlight the power of multi-disciplinary, multi-scale integrative approaches for understanding and manipulating fundamental biological processes, including cell motility, chromosome maintence, gene regulation and membrane-associated phenomena. Participants will also have an opportunity to broaden their appreciation of advances in structural biology that can be used for studying complex cellular systems via the concurrent meeting on High-Throughput Structural Biology, which will share a keynote address and two plenary sessions with this meeting.

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No registration fees are used to fund entertainment or alcohol at this conference

Conference Program    Print  |   View meeting in 12 hr (am/pm) time


SUNDAY, JANUARY 22

15:00—19:30
Registration

Longs Peak Foyer
18:15—19:15
Refreshments

Longs Peak Foyer
19:15—20:30
Welcome and Keynote Address (Joint)
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Longs/Grays Peaks
* Steven C. Almo, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, USA

* Ian A. Wilson, The Scripps Research Institute, USA

Wayne A. Hendrickson, Columbia University, USA
Looking into the Future of Structure Biology: Next-Generation Synchrotrons and Applications for Biology


MONDAY, JANUARY 23

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Quandary Peak
08:00—11:15
Pushing the Limits of Structural Biology I: Innovative Methods (Joint)
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Shavano/Red Cloud
* Wayne A. Hendrickson, Columbia University, USA

Bo Huang, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Molecular Complexes under the Light Microscope

Brian K. Shoichet, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Chemical Networks in Pharmacology

Kurt Wüthrich, ETH Zürich, The Scripps Research Institute, Switzerland
Solution NMR Studies of GPCR Structure and Function

Wah Chiu, Baylor College of Medicine, USA
Cryo-Electron Microscopy and Tomography of Viruses and Infected Cells

Graham T. Johnson, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Short Talk: Applications of Mesoscale Modeling and Visualization Software

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Longs Peak Foyer
11:15—13:00
Poster Setup

Grays
11:15
On Own for Lunch and Recreation

13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Grays

Following Session is for High-Throughput Structural Biology (J5)

14:15—16:30
Workshop 1: Advances in Methodologies and Tools for Structural Biology

Shavano
* Andrej Sali, University of California, San Francisco, USA

Martin Beck, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Germany
Investigating Human Nuclear Pore Composition by Targeted Mass Spectrometry

Franz Herzog, Gene Center Munich, Germany
Probing the Topology of Endogenous Human Protein Complexes by Chemical Cross-Linking and Mass Spectrometry

Nikolaos G. Sgourakis, University of California, Santa Cruz, USA
Advances in Structure Determination of Monomeric Proteins and Protein Complexes using Sparse NMR Data

John A. Tainer, The Scripps Research Institute, USA
Efficient Computational Assessments for Accurate Mass, Models and Resolution in Small-Angle Scattering Analyses

Charles H. Greenberg, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Threading a Protein Sequence onto its CryoEM Density Map

Gregory L. Warren, OpenEye Scientific Software Inc., USA
Automatic Ligand Conformer, Placement and Refinement Dictionary Generation Using Afitt

Ezgi Karaca, Utrecht University, Netherlands
A Flexible Multi-Domain Docking Approach to Deal with Large Conformational Changes in the Modeling of Biomolecular Complexes

David Hargreaves, AstraZeneca, UK
A Manual, Low-Cost Protein-Crystallisation Plate jig for in-situ Diffraction in the Home Laboratory

M.Y. Heidari Khajehpour, Institut de Biologie Structurale, France
G-Rob with Crystal Listing Function for a New High Throughput in situ X-Ray Diffraction

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Longs Peak Foyer
17:00—19:15
Neurodegenerative and Misfolding Diseases
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Red Cloud
* Kurt Wüthrich, ETH Zürich, The Scripps Research Institute, Switzerland

Gregory A. Petsko, Brandeis University, USA
Structural and Genetic Basis of Neurodegenerative Diseases

Raquel L. Lieberman, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA
Structural and Biophysical Insights into the Olfactomedin Domain of Myocilin: Implications for Glaucoma

Robert G. Griffin, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Atomic Resolution Structures of Amyloid Fibrils

Andy Baldwin, University of Toronto, Canada
Short Talk: NMR Spectroscopy, Mass Spectrometry and Electron Microscopy Elucidate the Structure and Dynamics of alphaB-Crystallin Oligomers

David E. Timm, Eli Lilly and Company, USA
Short Talk: Fragment-Based Design and Clinical Translation of BACE Inhibitors


Following Session is for High-Throughput Structural Biology (J5)

17:00—19:00
Advances in Protein Expression, Engineering and Crystallization for Structure Determination
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Shavano
* Andrzej Joachimiak, Argonne National Laboratory, USA

Imre Berger, EMBL Grenoble, France
Complexomics: New Tools and Strategies for Producing Eukaryotic Multiprotein Assemblies

Shohei Koide, New York University Langone Medical Center, USA
Designer Binding Proteins for Controlling Biology

Christopher G. Tate, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, UK
Conformational Thermostabilization and Engineering of Integral Membrane Proteins for Structural Studies

Shin-ichi Makino, University of Wisconson, Madison / CESG, USA
Short Talk: Strategies for Membrane Protein Preparation at the Transmembrane Protein Center Utilizing Cell-Free and Cell-based Systems

José Antonio Márquez, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), France
Short Talk: Crystal Direct : A New System for Automated Crystal Harvesting.

19:15—20:15
Social Hour with Lite Bites

Grays
19:30—22:00
Poster Session 1

Grays

TUESDAY, JANUARY 24

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Grays
08:00—11:00
Dynamical Machines in RNA Metabolism
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Red Cloud
Leemor Joshua-Tor, HHMI/Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, USA
Coupling RNAi to Heterochromatin: Insights into the Structural Core of the RITS Complex

* Anna Marie Pyle, Yale University, USA
Determinants of Splicing

Holger Stark, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Germany
Biochemical Stabilization and 3D Structure Determination of Dynamic Macromolecular Complexes

Alfonso Mondragón, Northwestern University, USA
Structure and Mechanism of Bacterial RNase P

John P. Marino, National Institute of Standards and Technology, USA
Short Talk: Structural Determinants of the Dimerization and Maturation of the HIV-1 Genomic RNA Dimerization Initiation Site


Following Session is for High-Throughput Structural Biology (J5)

08:00—11:15
Advances in Computational and Hybrid Approaches to Structure Determination
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Shavano
* Carol V. Robinson, University of Oxford, UK

Michael G. Rossmann, Purdue University, USA
Electron Microscopy, X-Ray Crystallography and Molecular Modeling for Structural Determination

David Baker, University of Washington, USA
Structure Determination using Sparse Experimental Data

Jianpeng Ma, Baylor College of Medicine, USA
Normal-Mode Refinement of Highly-Mobile X-Ray Structures at Lower Resolutions

Andrej Sali, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Integrative Structure Determination

Debora Marks, Harvard Medical School, USA
Short Talk: 3D Protein Structure Predicted de novo from Evolutionary Sequence Variation

Torsten Schwede, Biozentrum University of Basel & Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Switzerland
Short Talk: CAMEO - Continuous Automated Evaluation of Protein Structure Prediction Servers

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Foyer
11:00—13:00
Poster Setup

Grays
11:15
On Own for Lunch and Recreation

13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Grays

Following Session is for High-Throughput Structural Biology (J5)

14:15—16:30
Workshop 2: High-Throughput Approaches to the Structure and Function of Macromolecules and Biological Systems

Shavano
* Cheryl Arrowsmith, University of Toronto, Canada

Andrew B. Ward, The Scripps Research Institute, USA
Using Electron Microscopy to Rapidly Characterize the Interaction of Neutralizing Antibodies with Viral Envelope Proteins

Susanne Gräslund, University of Toronto, Canada
A Pipeline to Generate Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies to Human Target Proteins Linked to Epigenetic Mechanisms

John L. Markley, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA
PSI:Biology Mitochondrial Protein Partnership - Mission and Progress

Dušan Turk, Jozef Stefan Institute, Slovenia
Studies of Endosomal Proteins Involved in Immune Response and Their Targets from Human Pathogens

Andrzej Joachimiak, Argonne National Laboratory, USA
Glycoside Hydrolases from the Human Gut Microbiome

Gaetano Thomas Montelione, Rutgers University, USA
Critical Assessment of Automated Protein Structure Determination by NMR

Kevin S. Keating, Yale University, USA
Semi-Automated Model Building for RNA Crystallography

Juri Rappsilber, Wellcome Trust Centre, University of Edinburgh, UK
Structural Biology by Mass Spectrometry: 3D Proteomics of Supramolecular Assemblies

Margaret J. Gabanyi, PSI Structural Biology Knowledgebase - Rutgers University, USA
The PSI SBKB: A One-Stop Shop for Protein, Models, Functions, Methods and More

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Foyer
17:00—19:05
Cytoskeletal Organization and Function
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Red Cloud
* Michael K. Rosen, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA

Neil Q. McDonald, Cancer Research UK, UK
Molecular Analysis of a G-Actin Sensor

Ohad Medalia, Zurich University, Switzerland
Structural Study on Cell Adhesion by Cryo-Electron Tomography

Anne Houdusse, Institut Curie, France
How Myosin Motors Powers Cellular Functions: New Insights from Coupling Structural and Functional Insights

Nathaniel L. Elsen, AbbVie, USA
Short Talk: Biochemical and Structural Basis for the Abolition of S. aureus FtsZ Polymerization Cooperativity by the Cell-Division Inhibitor PC190723

Short Talk Chosen from Abstracts


Following Session is for High-Throughput Structural Biology (J5)

17:25—19:15
Advances in Membrane Proteins
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Shavano
* Andrew B. Ward, The Scripps Research Institute, USA

Robert M. Stroud, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Structures of Membrane Proteins and Multimeric Membrane Protein Complexes

Brian K. Kobilka, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA
Structural Insights into the Dynamic Process of G Protein Coupled Receptor Activation

Raymond C. Stevens, University of Southern California, USA
Understanding G-protein Coupled Receptor Molecular Recognition and Structural Diversity

Tracy M. Handel, University of California, San Diego, USA
Short Talk: Chemokine Receptors in Cell Signaling and Movement

Petra Fromme, Arizona State University, USA
Short talk: Femtosecond Nanocrystallography of Membrane Proteins

19:15—20:15
Social Hour with Lite Bites

Grays
19:30—22:00
Poster Session 2

Grays

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Grays
08:00—11:30
Pushing the Limits of Structural Biology II: Applications to Biological Systems (Joint)
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Shavano/Red Cloud
* Wah Chiu, Baylor College of Medicine, USA

Carolyn A. Larabell, University of California, San Francisco, USA
X-Ray Tomography of Organisms and Organelles

Carol V. Robinson, University of Oxford, UK
The Flight of Intact V-Type ATPases Provides a New Phase for Exploring Subunit Interactions and the Functional Role of Nucleotide and Lipid Binding

Timothy O. Street, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Short Talk: Extracting Mechanistic Information about the Hsp90 Molecular Chaperone with a Model Unfolded Protein Substrate

Lewis E. Kay, University of Toronto, Canada
Seeing the Invisible by Solution - NMR Spectroscopy

A. Joshua Wand, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Short Talk: Walking on Water: Enabling Site-Resolved Measurement of Hydration Dynamics with Solution NMR

Barry Honig, Columbia University / HHMI, USA
Toward the Integration of Structural and Systems Biology: Structure-Based Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions on a Genome-Wide Scale

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Foyer
11:15
On Own for Lunch and Recreation

16:00—16:30
Coffee Available

Foyer
16:30—18:10
Signaling and Switches
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Red Cloud
* Gregory A. Petsko, Brandeis University, USA

Robert T. Batey, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA
Structure and Function of Riboswitches

Michael K. Rosen, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA
Regulation of Actin Assembly from Angstroms to Microns

Mark A. Lemmon, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, USA
Structural Basis for Ligand Regulation of Growth Factor Receptors

Oliver Hantschel, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, Switzerland
Short Talk: Structural and Functional Analysis of the Regulation of the c-Abl and Bcr-Abl Tyrosine Kinases


Following Session is for High-Throughput Structural Biology (J5)

16:30—18:30
Novel Approaches to Decipher Function from Structure
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Shavano
* Gaetano Thomas Montelione, Rutgers University, USA

Nevan J. Krogan, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Advances in Characterization of Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

John A. Gerlt, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Discovering and Predicting New Functions in the Enolase Superfamily

Adam Godzik, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, USA
Inferring Function from Structure and Genome Context

William A. McLaughlin, Commonwealth Medical College, USA
Short Talk: KB-Role: An Online Resource for the Identification of Predicted Protein Functions and their Associated Probabilities

18:30—19:30
Debate 1: Is Structural Biology Being Hindered by Undue Deference to Biology? (Joint)
Structure biology traditionally has focused on macromolecules and systems that have been well-characterized biochemically and biologically. As a result, extraordinary progress has been made on selected systems where structure has given many insights into function. However, with the advent or high throughput sequencing from the genomic sequencing centers, only a tiny fraction of the possible proteins in the protein universe are associated with structures. Many proteins are designated as hypothetical proteins or domains of unknown function (DUF) – to some that seems to mean that structural pursuit of these proteins is waste of time until their biology is known and akin to stamp collecting. Even in systems such as protein kinases where the family and function are well understood, only relatively few structures are in the PDB of the over 500 kinases predicted in the human genome. Furthermore, it is now difficult to publish a paper in a high profile journal without substantial supporting biological data, and it is even more unlikely that one will get funding for structures without function unless specifically earmarked by NIH and other agencies. Hence, in many ways, structural biologists could be considered as subservient to ‘biologists’ and should only pursue macromolecules where the biology is known. This pervading notion assumes that we will learn nothing from determining a structure first and then pursuing the biology later, or that these collections of structures by themselves teaches one little about the biology or have no other inherent value. Should structural biologists then continue to by and large work only on a few well chosen systems, or should they be allowed to break free of these biological shackles to be able to take a more Darwinian approach and explore the wonders of the protein universe all by themselves?

Shavano
* Ian A. Wilson, The Scripps Research Institute, USA

Aled M. Edwards, University of Toronto, Canada

Gregory A. Petsko, Brandeis University, USA

Wayne A. Hendrickson, Columbia University, USA

Anna Marie Pyle, Yale University, USA

Abby F. Dernburg, University of California, Berkeley, USA

Robert M. Stroud, University of California, San Francisco, USA

Andrzej Joachimiak, Argonne National Laboratory, USA

Brian K. Kobilka, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA

James R. Williamson, The Scripps Research Institute, USA

19:15—20:15
Social Hour with Lite Bites

Grays

Following Session is for High-Throughput Structural Biology (J5)

19:45—22:00
Workshop 3: Mega Poster Session on World-Wide Structural Biology and Biology Center/Consortia and Large-Scale Databases and Repositories
Structural biology centers and consortia highlight the platforms, new methods, technologies, databases, and computational tools that that have been developed to advance protein production and macromolecular structure determination for all classes of targets from bacterial to human and on challenging macromolecules, such as membrane proteins, eukaryotic proteins and protein complexes. Likewise, Biology centers will illustrate how they are using high throughput approaches to tackle challenging biological problems. Emphasis will be placed on what is applicable to the entire community, including single investigator laboratories to increase success and throughput in the study of biological macromolecules, complexes, and biological systems.

Grays

THURSDAY, JANUARY 26

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Grays
08:00—11:15
Chromosome Organization and Function
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Red Cloud
* Anna Marie Pyle, Yale University, USA

Dylan J. Taatjes, University of Colorado Boulder, USA
Structure and Mechanism of the human Transcription Initiation Machinery

Abby F. Dernburg, University of California, Berkeley, USA
Imaging Chromosome Dynamics in Living Animals: Technical Challenges and Recent Advances

Antonina Roll-Mecak, NINDS, National Institutes of Health, USA
Tales of Tubulin Tails: Insights into Tubulin Post-Translational Modifications

Sheena D'Arcy, HHMI/Colorado State University, USA
Conformation and Dynamics of Histone Proteins

Hal A. Lewis, Bristol-Myers Squibb, USA
Short Talk: Crystal Structure of Inhibitor-Bound H1N1 Influenza Nucleoprotein Reveals Mode of Higher-Order Oligomerization

Ryan Rochat, Baylor College of Medicine, USA
Short Talk: Zernike Phase Contrast Cryo-Em Reveals the Structure of the Genome Packaging Apparatus in Herpes Simplex Virus


Following Session is for High-Throughput Structural Biology (J5)

08:00—11:25
High-Throughput Structural Biology Applied to Biological Systems
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Shavano
* Aled M. Edwards, University of Toronto, Canada

Udo Oppermann, University of Oxford, UK
Targeting the Histone Demethylome

Cheryl Arrowsmith, University of Toronto, Canada
Structural and Chemical Biology of the Readers of the Histone Code

James R. Williamson, The Scripps Research Institute, USA
Short Talk: Structural Genomics of Ribonucleoprotein Complexes Involved in T-Cell Activation

Steven C. Almo, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, USA
Challenges and Opportunities for High-Throughput Structural Biology of Eukaryotic Systems

Ian A. Wilson, The Scripps Research Institute, USA
Exploration of the Human Gut Microbiome

Lance Stewart, Institute for Protein Design at University of Washington, USA
Short Talk: SGCID: Four Hundred Protein Structures from Microbial Pathogens

09:00—09:20
Coffee Break

Foyer
 
On Own for Lunch and Recreation

16:00—16:30
Coffee Available

Foyer
16:30—18:15
Cellular Organization of Membrane Systems
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Red Cloud
* Axel T. Brünger, Stanford University, USA

Irina Serysheva, University of Texas-Houston Medical School, USA
Visualizing Transmembrane Helices in Calcium Release Channels by Single Particle Cryo-EM

Vinzenz M. Unger, Northwestern University, USA
Bending Boundaries - BAR Domain-Mediated Membrane Remodeling

Axel T. Brünger, Stanford University, USA
New Insights into the Mechanism of Calcium-Triggered Synaptic Vesicle Fusion by Single-Vesicle Content Mixing Microscopy and Single-Molecule Studies


Following Session is for High-Throughput Structural Biology (J5)

16:30—18:15
From Drug Targets to High-Throughput Structural Biology to the Clinic
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Grays Peak
* Brian K. Shoichet, University of California, San Francisco, USA

James C. Sacchettini, Texas A & M University, USA
New Approaches to Identifying Antibacterial Drug Targets and Drug Discovery

Aled M. Edwards, University of Toronto, Canada
Structural Genomics and Drug Discovery

Jonathan M. Moore, Vertex Pharmaceuticals Incorporated, USA
Short Talk: The Ectodomain Complex of the CGRP Receptor: Insights into Antagonism of a Class B GPRC

Anna Maria Tochowicz, Nektar Therapeutics, USA
Short Talk: New Drug Leads for Chagas’ Disease Identified by Fragment Chemistry and Structural Analysis

18:15—19:15
Debate 2: What Use Are the Ever-Accumulating Mountains of Structures and Associated Data, If It Takes Years, If Ever, to Use and Appreciate Them? (Joint)
Structural genomics and high-throughput structural biology have been criticized in the past for determining atomic-level macromolecular structures without accompanying functional characterization. But most of us contribute to some extent to this mountain of structures often with little associated biology. This issue will be revisited in light of the design of PSI:Biology and other world-wide HTP centers. Panelists will consider various applications of these experimentally determined structures and associated datasets by experimental and computational biologists alike. Panelists will also discuss the immediate and mid-term impact of structures of macromolecules and their assemblies at atomic as well as at lower resolutions. A key question then is how to maximize the impact of structural biology on biology.

Shavano
* Andrej Sali, University of California, San Francisco, USA

Brian K. Shoichet, University of California, San Francisco, USA

Barry Honig, Columbia University / HHMI, USA

Margaret J. Gabanyi, PSI Structural Biology Knowledgebase - Rutgers University, USA

Gaetano Thomas Montelione, Rutgers University, USA

Michael G. Rossmann, Purdue University, USA

David Baker, University of Washington, USA

Adam Godzik, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, USA

Cheryl Arrowsmith, University of Toronto, Canada

19:15—20:15
Social Hour with Lite Bites

Grays
20:15—23:00
Entertainment

Grays

FRIDAY, JANUARY 27

 
Departure


*Session Chair †Invited, not yet responded.



We gratefully acknowledge support for this conference from:


Directors' Fund


These generous unrestricted gifts allow our Directors to schedule meetings in a wide variety of important areas, many of which are in the early stages of research.

Click here to view all of the donors who support the Directors' Fund.



We gratefully acknowledge the generous grant for this conference provided by:


National Institutes of Health

Grant No. 1R13GM099406-01

The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.


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