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This meeting took place in 2013



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Molecular Clockworks and the Regulation of Cardio-Metabolic Function (C9)


Organizer(s) Garret A. FitzGerald and Joseph S. Takahashi
April 3—7, 2013
Snowbird Resort • Snowbird, Utah USA
Abstract Deadline: Dec 3, 2012
Late Abstract Deadline: Jan 3, 2013
Scholarship Deadline: Dec 3, 2012
Early Registration Deadline: Jan 28, 2013

Supported by the Directors' Fund

Summary of Meeting:
Several discoveries point to the importance of the molecular clockworks as an integrative system in biology. The molecular clock is highly conserved and remarkably robust in resisting disruption; it is highly regulated and is placed centrally amongst biological networks that communicate between tissues. In recent years it has become apparent that peripheral clocks, widely distributed, retain the capacity for independence as well as operating under the direction of the master clock in the supracharismatic nucleus (SCN). Indeed, evidence has begun to emerge that peripheral clocks talk to each other and back to the SCN. As we begin to understand the impact of major environmental influences, such as food restriction and fluctuations in body temperature, on clock integration and behavior, so we will begin to elucidate the roles of fine adjusters, such as hormones, physical forces and nutritional ingredients, all of which can impact asymmetrically individual peripheral clocks and potentially signal between them. Much remains to be learned about the multiple levels of regulation of clockworks at the transcriptional, translational, post translational and epigenomic levels, information that lends itself to systems wide analysis. Indeed, increasing insight into the systems biology of the molecular clock promises to rationalize selection of drug targets whereby we might modulate clock function. High throughput screens have already yielded novel approaches to regulating the phase and amplitude of molecular clocks. Evocation of clock dependent phenotypes in humans has come of age with recognition that the oscillatory nature of the metabolome and the ability to track gene oscillations in several tissues ex vivo will complement increasingly sophisticated approaches to segregating endogenous rhythms from tracking time dependent changes in tissue function in humans. Experiments in a range of model systems have pointed to the importance of the molecular clock in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, cardiovascular function and aging. This program will assemble investigators who work in multiple model systems, including humans to share information on the multiple ways in which the molecular clock is regulated, how its systems are integrated and how that knowledge might be harvested to enhance our understanding of human physiology and to yield novel treatments for human disease.

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Conference Program    Print  |   View meeting in 12 hr (am/pm) time


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3

16:00—20:00
Arrival and Registration


THURSDAY, APRIL 4

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

08:00—09:00
Welcome and Keynote Address
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online. Purchase an Abstract Book from this meeting

* Garret A. FitzGerald, University of Pennsylvania, USA

* Joseph S. Takahashi, HHMI/University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA

Eric Schadt, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, USA
Systems Integration by the Molecular Clock

09:00—11:00
Clockworks I
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online. Purchase an Abstract Book from this meeting

* Garret A. FitzGerald, University of Pennsylvania, USA

Joseph S. Takahashi, HHMI/University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA
Transcriptional Architecture and Chromatin Dynamics of the Circadian Clock

John Hogenesch, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, USA
A Transcriptional Map of Mouse Circadian Time and Space

Jerome Menet, Brandeis University, USA
Mechanistic Insights from Genome-Wide Circadian Regulation of Chromatin

11:00—12:00
Workshop: Program Tips from NIDDK

* Corinne M. Silva, NIDDK, National Institutes of Health, USA

09:40—10:00
Coffee Break

00:00—13:00
Poster Setup

13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

 
On Own for Lunch and Recreation

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

17:00—19:00
Clockworks II
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online. Purchase an Abstract Book from this meeting

* Carla B. Green, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA

Ueli Schibler, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Signaling to Peripheral Clocks

Thomas P. Burris, The Scripps Research Institute, USA
Chemical Biology of the Clock

Martha Merrow, University of Groningen, Netherlands
Rhythms from Molecules to Behavior in C. elegans

Immanuel Lerner, Hebrew University, Israel
Short Talk: Clk mRNA Turnover de-Noises Circadian Transcription and Behavior in Time and Space

19:00—20:00
Social Hour with Lite Bites

19:30—22:00
Poster Session 1


FRIDAY, APRIL 5

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

08:00—11:00
Cardio-Metabolic I
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online. Purchase an Abstract Book from this meeting

* Ueli Schibler, University of Geneva, Switzerland

Mukesh K. Jain, Case Western Reserve University, USA
KLF15 Links Circadian Rhythms to Cardiometabolic Function

Hitoshi Okamura, Kyoto University, Japan
Clock Gene, Aldosterone and Hypertension

David Rotter, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA
Short Talk: Regulator of Calcineurin 1 (Rcan1) Confers Time-of-Day Protection to the Heart from Ischemia/Reperfusion Damage

Felix Naef, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland
Mechanisms of Phase-Specific Circadian Transcription in Mouse Liver

Carla B. Green, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA
Circadian Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Metabolic Pathways

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

11:00—13:00
Poster Setup

13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

 
On Own for Lunch and Recreation

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

17:00—19:00
Clockworks III
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online. Purchase an Abstract Book from this meeting

* Martha Merrow, University of Groningen, Netherlands

Susan S. Golden, University of California, San Diego, USA
Regulation of and by the Circadian Oscillator in the Cyanobacterial Cell

Akhilesh B. Reddy, University of Cambridge, UK
EMBO Young Investigator Lecture: Redox Oscillations and the Clockwork

Hiroki R. Ueda, Center for Developmental Biology, Japan
Light-Response Program in the Mammalian Circadian Clocks

Pagkapol Y. Pongsawakul, University of California, San Diego, USA
Short Talk: The Role of Cytoplasmic CRYPTOCHROME in Regulating the cAMP Signaling Pathway

19:00—20:00
Social Hour with Lite Bites

19:30—22:00
Poster Session 2


SATURDAY, APRIL 6

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

08:00—11:00
Cardio-Metabolic II
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online. Purchase an Abstract Book from this meeting

* John Hogenesch, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, USA

R. Daniel Rudic, Georgia Regents University, USA
The Vascular Biology of the Circadian Clock

Satchidananda Panda, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, USA
Time-Restricted Feeding Protects Against Nutrition Challenges

Martin E. Young, University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA
Clock Control of Cardiac Metabolism and Function

Frank A.J.L. Scheer, Harvard Medical School, USA
Endogenous Biological Rhythms of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Function in Humans

Hélène Duez, Institut Pasteur Lille - INSERM - University of Lille, France
Short Talk: The Clock Component Rev-erbalpha Modulates Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Capacity by Regulating Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Autophagy

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

 
On Own for Lunch and Recreation

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

17:00—19:00
Cardio-Metabolic III
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online. Purchase an Abstract Book from this meeting

* Joseph S. Takahashi, HHMI/University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA

Joseph T. Bass, Northwestern University, USA
Metabolic Consequences and Bioenergetic Basis of Clock Dysfunction

Amita Sehgal, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, USA
Role of Steriod Signaling and a Nuclear Receptor in the Drosophila Clock

Annie Lee Hsieh, Johns Hopkins University, USA
Short Talk: Oncogenic c- and N-Myc Disrupt Circadian Rhythm

Garret A. FitzGerald, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Peripheral Clocks in Cardiometabolic and Central Function; Integration of the Inflammatory Response

19:00—20:00
Social Hour with Lite Bites

20:00—23:00
Entertainment


SUNDAY, APRIL 7

 
Departure


*Session Chair †Invited, not yet responded.



We gratefully acknowledge support for this conference from:


Directors' Fund


These generous unrestricted gifts allow our Directors to schedule meetings in a wide variety of important areas, many of which are in the early stages of research.

Click here to view all of the donors who support the Directors' Fund.



We gratefully acknowledge the generous grant for this conference provided by:


National Institutes of Health

Grant No. 5R13DK084688-04

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