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This meeting took place in 2001



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Molecular Helminthology: An Integrated Approach (A5)


Organizer(s) Philip T. LoVerde, Christine Li, Rick M. Maizels and Timothy G. Geary
January 20—25, 2001
Sagebrush Inn & Suites • Taos, New Mexico USA
Abstract Deadline: Sep 19, 2000
Late Abstract Deadline:
Scholarship Deadline:
Early Registration Deadline: Nov 20, 2000

Summary of Meeting:
The completion of the C. elegans genome sequence and the ease in which genes can now be inactivated in C. elegans provides a conceptual and practical framework to exploit the molecular biology and genetics of C. elegans for parallel studies in parasitic helminths. One major question to be addressed is, how do the molecular, physiological and developmental mechanisms used by C. elegans relate to those used by parasitic helminths? For example, insights into the development and functioning of the nervous system in C. elegans has spurred similar studies in parasitic helminths. A major task is to integrate the vast knowledge available from C. elegans with that available from parasitic helminths, and translate that information into relevant directions in the study of parasitic helminths. Although C. elegans is a free-living nematode, its genome has substantial homology with many of the parasitic helminths. The genetics of the C. elegans system allows for the elucidation of genetic and molecular pathways that may be conserved in other helminths. These pathways may identify processes that will be targets for selective chemotherapy.

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Conference Program    Print  |   View meeting in 12 hr (am/pm) time


SATURDAY, JANUARY 20

14:00—19:00
Registration

Chamisa Lobby
18:15—19:15
Welcome

Chamisa Lobby
19:15—19:30
Orientation

Chamisa Ballroom 2
19:30—20:30
Keynote Address
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Chamisa Ballroom 2
* Christine Li, Boston University, USA

Paul W. Sternberg, California Institute of Technology, USA
Nematode Sex: Development and Behavior


SUNDAY, JANUARY 21

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Los Vaqueros
08:00—11:00
Helminth Genomes. Goal: Current status of parasite genomes and available techniques used to examine the C. elegans genome.
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Chamisa Ballroom 2
Steven Jones, Genome Sequence Centre, Canada
Functional Genomics and C. elegans

Mark L. Blaxter, University of Edinburgh, UK
Gene Discovery in Parasitic Nematodes

* Timothy J. Littlewood, Natural History Museum, UK
Trematode Genomics and Phylogenetics

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Chamisa Lobby
16:30—18:30
Workshop 1: Worm Genome Projects - Current Status

Chamisa Ballroom 2
* Mark L. Blaxter, University of Edinburgh, UK

James P. McCarter, Virta Health, USA
High Throughput Gene Discovery in Parasitic Nematodes: Results from Meloidogyne, Ancylostoma, and Strongyloides ESTs

Klaus Ruediger Brehm, Universität Würzburg, Germany
mRNA Trans-Splicing in the Human Parastic Cestodes Echinoccus Multilocularis and E. granulosus

Ann E. Sluder, Cambria Biosciences LLC, USA
Nuclear Receptors in Nematodes: What Genome Comparisons Reveal

Charles H. Opperman, North Carolina State University, USA
Plant Nematode Genes Involved in the Establishment of Parasitic Interaction

Christian Epe, Novartis Centre de Recherche Santé Animale SA, Switzerland
Differences in Gene Expression of Persistent and Non-Persistent Lavae of Dictyocaulus viviparus

Ibrahim Hassan Kamal, Ain Shams University, Egypt
Analysis of the Filiarial Parasite Brugia malayi Adult Male Stage EST Clusters of Novel Gene Identification

James B. Lok, University of Pennsylvania, USA
DNA Transformation of Strongyloides Stercorlis by Germline Microinjection

Volker Wippersteg, University Duesseldorf, Germany
Towards Transgenic Schistosomes

16:30—18:30
Social Hour

Chamisa Ballroom 1
18:30—19:30
Coffee Available

Chamisa Lobby
18:30—20:30
Helminth Development I. Goal: Identify pathways responsible for development.
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Chamisa Ballroom 2
* Piali Sengupta, Brandeis University, USA
Development and Function of Sensory Neurons in C. elegans

Scott W. Emmons, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, USA
Patterning of C. elegans Male Rays by Hox Genes

Timothy P. Yoshino, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA
Development of Intramolluscan Stages of Blood and Liver Flukes: Advances in in vitro Cultivation


MONDAY, JANUARY 22

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Los Vaqueros
08:00—11:00
Helminth Development II. Goal: Signal transduction pathways and their role in development and host-parasite interactions.
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Chamisa Ballroom 2
* Philip T. LoVerde, University of Texas Health Science Center, USA
Role of Nuclear Receptors in Schistosome Development

Claude V. Maina, New England Biolabs Inc., USA
Role of Nuclear Receptors in Filarial Development

Melissa J. Beall, Cornell University, USA
TGF-beta Signaling in Schistosoma mansoni

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Chamisa Lobby
11:00—13:00
Poster Setup

Chamisa Ballroom 1
16:30—18:30
POSTER SESSION 1: Genomics and Helminth Development

Chamisa Ballroom 1
16:30—18:30
Social Hour

Chamisa Ballroom 1
18:30—19:30
Coffee Available

Chamisa Lobby
18:30—21:00
Helminth Responses to Their Environment. Goal: Describe the different systems used by helminths to respond to their environment.
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Chamisa Ballroom 2
Charles H. Opperman, North Carolina State University, USA
C. egelgans as a Model for Human Disease

* Monica Driscoll, Rutgers University, USA
The Mechanosensory System in C. elegans

David Bird, NC State University, USA
Genetics, Genomics and Cell Biology of Nematode Parasitism; The Power of Plants as Tractable Models

Judith Appleton, Cornell University, USA
Invasion of Epithelia by Trichinella spiralis


TUESDAY, JANUARY 23

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Los Vaqueros
08:00—11:00
Helminth Neurobiology I. Goal: Determine the basis of helminth behavior.
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Chamisa Ballroom 2
Edwin Pog Cuppen, Hubrecht Laboratory, Netherlands
G Protein Function in C. elegans

* Christine Li, Boston University, USA
FMRFamide-Related Neuropeptide Gene Family in Caenorhabditis elegans

Anne C. Hart, Massachusetts General Hospital, USA
Modulation of C. elegans Behavior: Addressing the Role of Serotonin and Neuropeptides in a Simple Circuit

Aaron G. Maule, Queen's University of Belfast, UK
Neuropeptide Structure and Function in Parasitic Helminths

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Chamisa Lobby
11:00—13:00
Poster Setup

Chamisa Ballroom 1
16:30—18:30
POSTER SESSION 2: Helminth Neurobiology/Genetics and Biochemistry of Drug Targets, Drug Action and Resistance

Chamisa Ballroom 1
16:30—18:30
Social Hour

Chamisa Ballroom 1
18:30—19:30
Coffee Available

Chamisa Lobby
18:30—20:30
Helminth Neurobiology II
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Chamisa Ballroom 2
Paula Ribeiro, McGill University, Canada
Molecular Properties of Monoamine Receptors in Helminths

Gerhard A. Schad, University of Pennsylvania, USA
The Cell-Specific Investigation of Behavior and Development of Nematode Parasites: Which Neurons Control?

* Timothy G. Geary, McGill University, Canada
Is There a Future for Anthelmintics?


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Los Vaqueros
08:00—11:00
Genetics and Biochemistry of Drug Targets, Drug Action and Resistance I. Goal: Identify drug targets and the mechanisms helminths use to develop drug resistance.
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Chamisa Ballroom 2
Nicholas C. Sangster, University of Sydney, Australia
Resistance to Anthelmintics: Is C. elegans a Good Model?

Marleen H. Roos, DLO-Institute for Animal Science & Health, Netherlands
Genetic and Molecular Aspects for Selection of Drug Resistance in Parasitic Helminths

Donato Cioli, Institute of Cell Biology, Italy
Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in Schistosomes

* Timothy A. Day, Iowa State University, USA
Drug Resistance to Praziquantel

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Chamisa Lobby
14:30—16:30
Genetics and Biochemistry of Drug Targets, Drug Action and Resistance II
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Chamisa Ballroom 2
Richard W. Komuniecki, University of Toledo, USA
Coordination of Contraction/Metabolism in Body Wall Muscle of the Parasitic Nematode, Ascaris suum

Murray E. Selkirk, Imperial College London, UK
Secreted Acetylcholinesterases of Intestinal Nematodes

* Richard M. Maizels, University of Edinburgh, UK
Immune Evasion Genes from Nematode Parasites

16:30—17:30
Coffee & Snacks Available

Chamisa Lobby
17:00—19:00
WORKSHOP: Threat of Drug Resistance-Strategy Session. Session Sponsored by The Burroughs Wellcome Fund

Chamisa Ballroom 2
* Nicholas C. Sangster, University of Sydney, Australia

* Daniel G. Colley, University of Georgia, USA

* James Bennett, Keystone Symposia, USA

* Philip T. LoVerde, University of Texas Health Science Center, USA

 
1. What is the level of the threat of drug resistance in medically important helminths?

Chamisa Ballroom 2
 
2. How can medical helminthologists capitalize on model systems work?

Chamisa Ballroom 2
 
3. How applicable are current model systems and what others are needed?

Chamisa Ballroom 2
 
4. Understanding vs. Tools: What is the capability and where is the balance?

Chamisa Ballroom 2
19:00—20:00
Social Hour

Chamisa Lobby
20:00—22:00
Banquet

Chamisa Ballroom 1
21:00—00:00
Entertainment

Chamisa Ballroom 1

THURSDAY, JANUARY 25

 
Departure


*Session Chair †Invited, not yet responded.



We gratefully acknowledge the generous grant for this conference provided by:


National Institutes of Health

Grant No. 1 R13 AI48919-01




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