Granlibakken Tahoe Floorplan

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This meeting took place in 2001



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Molecular Clocks: Regulation of Circadian Behavioral Rhythms (D5)


Organizer(s) Michael W. Young, Ueli Schibler and Steven M. Reppert
March 20—25, 2001
Granlibakken Tahoe • Tahoe City, California USA
Abstract Deadline: Nov 20, 2000
Late Abstract Deadline:
Scholarship Deadline:
Early Registration Deadline: Jan 19, 2001

Sponsored in part by the Director's Sponsor Fund

Summary of Meeting:
Several homologous clock genes regulate circadian behavioral rhythms throughout the animal kingdom. Most of these have been identified within the last 3-4 years by genetic screening in Drosophila and in the mouse. Clock genes encode interacting, autoregulatory proteins that promote self-sustaining molecular cycles of gene expression. These intracellular cycles depend on (1) transcriptional feedback loops, and (2) regulated RNA and protein turnover. Light resets these molecular clocks by altering the levels of certain clock gene products in specific patterns. Novel photoreceptors, cryptochromes, have been linked to these photic responses in some animals and in plants. While behaviors such as daily locomotor activity cycles in Drosophila or sleep/wake cycles in mice are regulated by defined neurons in the brain, very recent work has identified peripheral clocks that use the same set of genes to autonomously generate circadian molecular cycles in tissues as diverse as heart, liver, and retina. The past year has also witnessed the development of immortalized cell cultures as tools for examining circadian molecular rhythms. This Keystone Symposium is intended to provide a forum for communicating the results of this rapidly moving field in relation to all of the above areas, to increase our understanding of the mechanistic links connecting the molecular cycles to timed behavior, and to generate a medium for describing new approaches and concepts that have emerged in this area of molecular biology.

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No registration fees are used to fund entertainment or alcohol at this conference

Conference Program    Print  |   View meeting in 12 hr (am/pm) time


TUESDAY, MARCH 20

14:00—19:00
Registration

Lobby
19:15—19:30
Orientation

Granhall
19:30—20:30
The Human Clock
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Granhall
* Michael W. Young, Rockefeller University, USA

Louis Ptacek, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Genetic Studies of Familial Sleep Phase Syndrome


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Granhall
08:00—11:00
Transcriptional Controls Within Circadian Clocks
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Mountain Room
* Susan S. Golden, University of California, San Diego, USA

Steven M. Reppert, Massachusetts General Hospital, USA
Molecular Regulation of the Mammalian Clock

Hitoshi Okamura, Kyoto University, Japan
mPer1 in Mammalian Circadian Oscillation

Dorothee Staiger, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Switzerland
A Role for RNA-Binding Proteins in the Circadian System of Arabidopsis

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Prefunction
11:00—13:00
Poster Setup

Bay Room
15:00—17:00
Workshop 1

Mountain Room
* Jay C. Dunlap, Dartmouth Medical School, USA

Joseph C. Besharse, Medical College of Wisconsin, USA

Jean-Christophe Leloup, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium

Nicholas Mrosovsky, University of Toronto, Canada

Rae Silver, Columbia University, USA

Yoshitaka Fukada, University of Tokyo, Japan

Carol Lynn Thompson, Allen Institute for Brain Science, USA

Nicolas Cermakian, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Canada

Nicolas Cermakian, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Canada

17:00—18:00
Poster Session 1: Entrainment Clock-Controlled Function and Peripheral Clocks

Bay Room
17:00—18:00
Social Hour

Bay Room
18:00—19:00
Dinner

Granhall
19:00—20:00
Coffee Available

Prefunction
19:00—21:00
Entrainment Mechanisms Regulating Mammalian Circadian Clocks
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Mountain Room
* Joseph S. Takahashi, HHMI/University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA

Jan H. J. Hoeijmakers, Erasmus MC, Netherlands
Cryptochromes and the Biological Clock

Russell G. Foster, Imperial College School of Medicine, UK
A Novel Opsin-based Ocular Photopigment Mediates Circadian and Non-circadian Responses to Light

Michael H. Hastings, ,
mPer Genes as Targets for Convergent Entraining Pathways in the SCN


THURSDAY, MARCH 22

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Granhall
08:00—11:00
Multiple Oscillators and Peripheral Clocks
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Mountain Room
* Steven M. Reppert, Massachusetts General Hospital, USA

Ueli Schibler, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Circadian Gene Expression in SCN Neurons and Peripheral Cells

Paolo Sassone-Corsi, University of California, Irvine, USA
Signaling and Independent Peripheral Pacemakers

Paul E. Hardin, University of Houston, USA
An Autonomous Circadian Oscillator Regulates Olfactory Responses in Drosophila

Michael Menaker, University of Virginia, USA
What Holds the Mammalian Circadian System Together?

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Prefunction
11:00—13:00
Poster Setup

Bay Room
15:00—17:00
Workshop 2

Mountain Room
* Rae Silver, Columbia University, USA

Gregory Michael Cahill, University of Houston, USA

Vincent Michael Cassone, Texas A & M University, USA

David M. Virshup, University of Utah, USA

Filippo Tamanini, Erasmus University, Netherlands

Franck Delaunay, Universite de Nice, France

Daniel E. Kolker, Northwestern University, USA

17:00—18:00
Poster Sessions 1 & 2: Open Viewing

Bay Room
17:00—18:00
Social Hour

Bay Room
18:00—19:00
Dinner

Granhall
19:00—20:00
Coffee Available

Prefunction
19:00—21:00
Genetic Control of Mammalian Wake/Sleep Cycles
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Mountain Room
* Michael H. Hastings, ,

Emmanuel Mignot, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA
Narcolepsy and Hypocretin (orexin)

Cheng Chi Lee, University of Texas Health Science Center, USA
Essential Role of mPer1 and mPer2 in the Mouse Circadian Clock

Steven L. McKnight, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA
PAS Proteins, Possible Links Between Cellular Metabolism and Circadian Oscillators


FRIDAY, MARCH 23

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Granhall
08:00—11:00
Transcriptional and Posttranscriptional Control of Molecular Cycling
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Mountain Room
* Michael Menaker, University of Virginia, USA

Michael W. Young, Rockefeller University, USA
A Role for the Segment Polarity Gene shaggy in the Drosophila Circadian Clock

Jay C. Dunlap, Dartmouth Medical School, USA
Feedback Loops in the Neurospora Circadian System

Joseph S. Takahashi, HHMI/University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA
Transcriptional and Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Mammalian Circadian Clocks

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Prefunction
15:00—17:00
Workshop 3

Mountain Room
* Elaine M. Tobin, University of California, Los Angeles, USA

Norio K. Ishida, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Japan

Rob Jackson, Tufts University School of Medicine, USA

Hideo Iwasaki, Nagoya University, Japan

Michael F. Covington, The Scripps Research Institute, USA

Steven A. Brown, University of Zurich, Switzerland

Krista Kaasik, University of California, San Francisco, USA

Anthony J. Harmar, Royal Edinburgh Hospital, UK

17:00—18:00
Poster Session 2: Molecular Clockworks

Lake Room
17:00—18:00
Social Hour

Lake Room
18:00—19:00
Dinner

Granhall
19:00—20:00
Coffee Available

Prefunction
19:00—21:00
Molecular Responses to Light in Non-Mammalian Systems
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Mountain Room
* Carla B. Green, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA

Susan S. Golden, University of California, San Diego, USA
A Bacteriophytochrome Resets the Cyanobacterial Circadian Clock

David Alabadi, The Scripps Research Institute, USA

Ralf Stanewsky, Universitat Regensburg, Germany
Multiple Light Inputs Synchronize Drosophila's Circadian Clock


SATURDAY, MARCH 24

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Granhall
08:00—11:00
Phylogeny of Circadian Clocks
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Mountain Room
* Jennifer J. Loros, Dartmouth Medical School, USA

Bambos P. Kyriacou, University of Leicester, UK
Comparative Analysis of Clock Molecules: Structure and Function

Takao Kondo, Nagoya University, Japan
Molecular Basis for Circadian Oscillation in Cyanobacteria

Carla B. Green, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA
Molecular Regulation of the Xenopus laevis Circadian Clock

Elaine M. Tobin, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
The Roles of the Transcription Factor CCA1 and the Protein Kinase CK2 in Plant Circadian Rhythms

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Prefunction
16:00—17:00
Coffee Available

Prefunction
17:00—19:00
Regulation of Activity Cycles and Other Outputs of the Circadian Clock
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Mountain Room
* Ueli Schibler, University of Geneva, Switzerland

Jennifer J. Loros, Dartmouth Medical School, USA
Clock Regulated Output in the Neurospora Circadian System

Amita Sehgal, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, USA
Control of Rest: Activity Rhythms by Genes of the Drosophila Circadian Clock

Charlotte Helfrich-Foerster, University of Tubingen, Germany
Neuropeptide Regulation of Circadian Behavior

19:00—20:00
Social Hour

Prefunction
20:00—22:00
Banquet

Lake/Bay Room
21:00—00:00
Entertainment

Lake/Bay Room

SUNDAY, MARCH 25

 
Departure


*Session Chair †Invited, not yet responded.



We gratefully acknowledge the generous grant for this conference provided by:


National Institutes of Health
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

Grant No. 1 R13 MH62508-01




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