Neuronal Cell Biology: A Biology of Extremes

Web Desc
Neuronal Cell Biology: A Biology of Extremes - RESCHEDULING IN PROGRESS
Scientific Organizers: Timothy A. Ryan and Erin M. Schuman
Date: January 23 - 26, 2021
Location: Eldorado Hotel & Spa, Santa Fe, NM, USA
Supported by the Directors' Fund
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Summary of Meeting:
Neurons are a perfect example of the biology of extremes. Most neurons in the brain must live without dividing for 7-9 decades of life. Individual cells cover spatial expanses that are truly enormous compared to the molecular scale. Although cell somas of neurons are comparable in size to many other types of cells in the body, neurons are polarized cells and the output compartment, the axon, of an individual cell in the brain can extend up to 40 cm in a rodent and probably much further in a human, i.e. 20,000 times more than typical cells. The molecular basis of how neurons are built and sustained at these “extremes” is a central problem in neuronal biology. The tools needed to understand basic questions like protein and lipid synthesis and turnover in neurons as well the metabolic basis of synaptic performance are just beginning to emerge. These properties are all thought to be particularly impactful in diseases associated with aging, such as most neurodegenerative diseases. As these rapid and major ongoing advances in neuronal cell biology continue, they have allowed for a mechanistic understanding and therapeutic intervention in many neurologic diseases. This conference will convene leaders in the field, together with trainees and emerging investigators, to address cutting-edge advances in this rapidly evolving field.
We gratefully acknowledge the generous grant for this conference provided by:

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Grant No. 1R13NS118793-01
Funding for this conference was made possible (in part) by 1R13NS118793-01 from the National Institutes of Health. The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention by trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
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Special thanks to the following for their support of Keystone Symposia initiatives to increase participation at this meeting by scientists from underrepresented backgrounds:

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