Web Desc
Histone Code: Fact or Fiction?
Organizer(s): Karolin Luger, James Davie and Joanna Wysocka
Date: January 10 - 15, 2011
Location: Zermatt Resort & Spa - Utah, Midway, Utah, USA
Sponsored by Pfizer Inc.
For important information on the coronavirus, please click here
Summary of Meeting:
It has become customary to refer to posttranslational histone modifications in all contexts as “epigenetic”, and to refer to a histone ‘code’. In certain contexts, histone modifications contribute to the epigenetic maintenance, whereas in others, they don’t. Similarly, some of the phenomena attributed to the posttranslational modification of histones do not fall into the strict definition of a ‘histone code’. This meeting strives to bring together scientists from different ‘camps’, to illuminate the effects of posttranslational modifications from many viewpoints. The emphasis here is on the effect of PTMs on the structure and readout of the genome, and less on the enzymatic activities and their regulation. Speakers will be encouraged to engage in rigorous discussion, as is obvious in the format for the opening and closing session which will be held in discussion format. In particular, we plan to • Investigate how histone modifications participate in the maintenance of epigenetic information • Elaborate on recent findings that epigenetic states are likely conveyed as a dynamic equilibrium of opposing modifying activities that involves feedback loops, and talk about ‘epigenetic memory’ • How do histone modifications affect nucleosome / chromatin structure and stability / interaction with chromatin architectural proteins? • Discuss the responsiveness of the epigenetic process, and the 3-D interplay in the nuclear environment that ultimately decides which gene will be fired up. • Have a workshop highlighting newest approaches / technologies to study histone modification states. • Have a final round table discussion to perhaps re-define and tighten up terminology, and to consolidate viewpoints where possible.
Scholarship Deadline: September 16 2010
Discounted Abstract Deadline: September 16 2010
Abstract Deadline: October 13 2010
Discounted Registration Deadline: November 10 2010
We gratefully acknowledge additional support for this conference from:
Cell Signaling Technology, Inc.Novus Biologicals, Inc.Pfizer Inc.


Yamini Dalal
We gratefully acknowledge the generous grant for this conference provided by:

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Grant No. 5R13DK084688-02
We appreciate the organizations that provide Keystone Symposia with additional support, such as marketing and advertising:

Click here to view more of these organizations
Special thanks to the following for their support of Keystone Symposia initiatives to increase participation at this meeting by scientists from underrepresented backgrounds:

Click here to view more of these organizations

Program

Monday, January 10 | 3:00PM - 7:30PM
Registration
Room: Matterhorn Foyer


Monday, January 10 | 6:15PM - 7:15PM
Refreshments
Room: Matterhorn Foyer/Mtn Rosa


Monday, January 10 | 7:15PM - 9:30PM
Welcome and Keynote Session
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Discuss ‘histone code’ and give a historic perspective.
Speaker 1 of 2
Bryan M. Turner, University of Birmingham, UK
Evolution of the Histone Code “Historical Perspective”

Monday, January 10 | 7:15PM - 9:30PM
Welcome and Keynote Session
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Discuss ‘histone code’ and give a historic perspective.
Speaker 2 of 2
C. David Allis, Rockefeller University, USA
A Historical Journey towards and beyond the “Histone Code” hypothesis

Tuesday, January 11 | 6:30AM - 8:00AM
Breakfast
Room: Bernese Event Center


Tuesday, January 11 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Relationship between Epigenetics and Histone Modifications
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Highlight the most recent evidence that histone modifications participate in the maintenance of epigenetic information:
(i) Discuss how histone modifications contribute to the maintenance of gene expression patterns
(ii) Show recent evidence on how epigenetic states can be reversed (e.g. during reprogramming)
(iii) Highlight progress that has been made on the mechanisms of transmission of histone modifications during replication
Speaker 1 of 7
* Siavash K. Kurdistani, University of California, Los Angeles, USA

Tuesday, January 11 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Relationship between Epigenetics and Histone Modifications
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Highlight the most recent evidence that histone modifications participate in the maintenance of epigenetic information:
(i) Discuss how histone modifications contribute to the maintenance of gene expression patterns
(ii) Show recent evidence on how epigenetic states can be reversed (e.g. during reprogramming)
(iii) Highlight progress that has been made on the mechanisms of transmission of histone modifications during replication
Speaker 2 of 7
Danesh Moazed, Harvard Medical School, USA
Histone Modifications in Heterochromatin Assembly and Propagation

Tuesday, January 11 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Relationship between Epigenetics and Histone Modifications
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Highlight the most recent evidence that histone modifications participate in the maintenance of epigenetic information:
(i) Discuss how histone modifications contribute to the maintenance of gene expression patterns
(ii) Show recent evidence on how epigenetic states can be reversed (e.g. during reprogramming)
(iii) Highlight progress that has been made on the mechanisms of transmission of histone modifications during replication
Speaker 3 of 7
Nicole J. Francis, Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal, Canada
Investigating the Mechanism and Maintenance of Polycomb Group proteins proteins on Chromatin through DNA Replication

Tuesday, January 11 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Relationship between Epigenetics and Histone Modifications
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Highlight the most recent evidence that histone modifications participate in the maintenance of epigenetic information:
(i) Discuss how histone modifications contribute to the maintenance of gene expression patterns
(ii) Show recent evidence on how epigenetic states can be reversed (e.g. during reprogramming)
(iii) Highlight progress that has been made on the mechanisms of transmission of histone modifications during replication
Speaker 4 of 7
Barbara Panning, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Epigenetic Regulation of Embryonic Stem Cell Self-Renewal

Tuesday, January 11 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Relationship between Epigenetics and Histone Modifications
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Highlight the most recent evidence that histone modifications participate in the maintenance of epigenetic information:
(i) Discuss how histone modifications contribute to the maintenance of gene expression patterns
(ii) Show recent evidence on how epigenetic states can be reversed (e.g. during reprogramming)
(iii) Highlight progress that has been made on the mechanisms of transmission of histone modifications during replication
Speaker 5 of 7
Stavros Lomvardas, Columbia University, USA
Short Talk: The Histone Thingy as a Postal Code

Tuesday, January 11 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Relationship between Epigenetics and Histone Modifications
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Highlight the most recent evidence that histone modifications participate in the maintenance of epigenetic information:
(i) Discuss how histone modifications contribute to the maintenance of gene expression patterns
(ii) Show recent evidence on how epigenetic states can be reversed (e.g. during reprogramming)
(iii) Highlight progress that has been made on the mechanisms of transmission of histone modifications during replication
Speaker 6 of 7
Bharat D. Reddy, bluebird bio, USA
Short Talk: DeMYSTifying Heterochromatin

Tuesday, January 11 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Relationship between Epigenetics and Histone Modifications
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Highlight the most recent evidence that histone modifications participate in the maintenance of epigenetic information:
(i) Discuss how histone modifications contribute to the maintenance of gene expression patterns
(ii) Show recent evidence on how epigenetic states can be reversed (e.g. during reprogramming)
(iii) Highlight progress that has been made on the mechanisms of transmission of histone modifications during replication
Speaker 7 of 7
Joanna Wysocka, Stanford University, USA
A Unique Chromatin Signature Identifies Early Developmental Enhancers in Humans

Tuesday, January 11 | 9:20AM - 9:40AM
Coffee Break
Room: Matterhorn Foyer


Tuesday, January 11 | 11:15AM - 1:00PM
Poster Setup
Room: Bernese Event Center


Tuesday, January 11 | 1:00PM - 10:00PM
Poster Viewing
Room: Bernese Event Center


Tuesday, January 11 | 1:00PM - 1:00PM
On Own for Lunch and Recreation


Tuesday, January 11 | 4:30PM - 5:00PM
Coffee Available
Room: Matterhorn Foyer


Tuesday, January 11 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Re-Programming Epigenetic States
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 1 of 6
* Joanna Wysocka, Stanford University, USA

Tuesday, January 11 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Re-Programming Epigenetic States
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 2 of 6
Azim Surani, University of Cambridge, UK
Role of Epigenetic Mechanisms in the Establishment and Regulation of Mouse Germ Cells

Tuesday, January 11 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Re-Programming Epigenetic States
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 3 of 6
Siavash K. Kurdistani, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
Regulating Global Levels of Histone Modifications

Tuesday, January 11 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Re-Programming Epigenetic States
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 4 of 6
Yehudit Bergman, Hebrew University Medical School, Israel
Short Talk: Epigenetic Control of Immunoglobulin Allelic Exclusion

Tuesday, January 11 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Re-Programming Epigenetic States
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 5 of 6
Cheng-Ran Xu, Peking University, China
Short Talk: Chromatin Modifiers in Embryonic Endoderm Cells Promote Differential Induction of Liver or Pancreas

Tuesday, January 11 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Re-Programming Epigenetic States
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 6 of 6
Emily Bernstein, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, USA
Short Talk: The Histone Variant macroH2A Suppresses Progression of Malignant Melanoma

Tuesday, January 11 | 7:00PM - 8:00PM
Social Hour with Lite Bites
Room: Bernese Event Center


Tuesday, January 11 | 7:30PM - 10:00PM
Poster Session 1
Room: Bernese Event Center


Wednesday, January 12 | 6:30AM - 8:00AM
Breakfast
Room: Bernese Event Center


Wednesday, January 12 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Mechanistic Nature of Epigenetic Memory
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Understood as propagation of gene expression patterns over many cell generations. A static model of epigenetic memory that relies on the stability of modification mark on a given nucleosome is dead. Instead, it becomes increasingly clear that epigenetic states are likely conveyed as a dynamic equilibrium of opposing modifying activities such as methyltransferases and demethylases that involves feedback loops.
Note that to some extent the preceding session has covered some of these topics.
There is recent theoretical work (e.g. Dodd et al., Cell 2007) that propose a dynamic model of epigenetic memory based on bistability. This model has some fascinating predictions. Unfortunately, it seems it received less attention from the field than it should (as someone put it, “biologists are a fearful bunch”).
Topics to be covered:
(i) To have a theoretical biology component, hopefully presented in a way that is accessible to biologists
(ii) To discuss existing evidence on feedback loops involving histone modifications and their integration with transcriptional networks; also discussion what is the role of transcription factors in epigenetic memory
(iii) Experimental models of epigenetic memory
(iv) Role of chromatin in dampening transcriptional noise
Speaker 1 of 8
* Laurie A. Boyer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

Wednesday, January 12 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Mechanistic Nature of Epigenetic Memory
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Understood as propagation of gene expression patterns over many cell generations. A static model of epigenetic memory that relies on the stability of modification mark on a given nucleosome is dead. Instead, it becomes increasingly clear that epigenetic states are likely conveyed as a dynamic equilibrium of opposing modifying activities such as methyltransferases and demethylases that involves feedback loops.
Note that to some extent the preceding session has covered some of these topics.
There is recent theoretical work (e.g. Dodd et al., Cell 2007) that propose a dynamic model of epigenetic memory based on bistability. This model has some fascinating predictions. Unfortunately, it seems it received less attention from the field than it should (as someone put it, “biologists are a fearful bunch”).
Topics to be covered:
(i) To have a theoretical biology component, hopefully presented in a way that is accessible to biologists
(ii) To discuss existing evidence on feedback loops involving histone modifications and their integration with transcriptional networks; also discussion what is the role of transcription factors in epigenetic memory
(iii) Experimental models of epigenetic memory
(iv) Role of chromatin in dampening transcriptional noise
Speaker 2 of 8
Ian Dodd, University of Adelaide, Australia
Modeling Cell Memory by Nucleosome Modification Containment – Defining Chromatin Regions

Wednesday, January 12 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Mechanistic Nature of Epigenetic Memory
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Understood as propagation of gene expression patterns over many cell generations. A static model of epigenetic memory that relies on the stability of modification mark on a given nucleosome is dead. Instead, it becomes increasingly clear that epigenetic states are likely conveyed as a dynamic equilibrium of opposing modifying activities such as methyltransferases and demethylases that involves feedback loops.
Note that to some extent the preceding session has covered some of these topics.
There is recent theoretical work (e.g. Dodd et al., Cell 2007) that propose a dynamic model of epigenetic memory based on bistability. This model has some fascinating predictions. Unfortunately, it seems it received less attention from the field than it should (as someone put it, “biologists are a fearful bunch”).
Topics to be covered:
(i) To have a theoretical biology component, hopefully presented in a way that is accessible to biologists
(ii) To discuss existing evidence on feedback loops involving histone modifications and their integration with transcriptional networks; also discussion what is the role of transcription factors in epigenetic memory
(iii) Experimental models of epigenetic memory
(iv) Role of chromatin in dampening transcriptional noise
Speaker 3 of 8
Jürg Müller, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Germany
Molecular Mechanisms of the Polycomb/Trithorax System

Wednesday, January 12 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Mechanistic Nature of Epigenetic Memory
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Understood as propagation of gene expression patterns over many cell generations. A static model of epigenetic memory that relies on the stability of modification mark on a given nucleosome is dead. Instead, it becomes increasingly clear that epigenetic states are likely conveyed as a dynamic equilibrium of opposing modifying activities such as methyltransferases and demethylases that involves feedback loops.
Note that to some extent the preceding session has covered some of these topics.
There is recent theoretical work (e.g. Dodd et al., Cell 2007) that propose a dynamic model of epigenetic memory based on bistability. This model has some fascinating predictions. Unfortunately, it seems it received less attention from the field than it should (as someone put it, “biologists are a fearful bunch”).
Topics to be covered:
(i) To have a theoretical biology component, hopefully presented in a way that is accessible to biologists
(ii) To discuss existing evidence on feedback loops involving histone modifications and their integration with transcriptional networks; also discussion what is the role of transcription factors in epigenetic memory
(iii) Experimental models of epigenetic memory
(iv) Role of chromatin in dampening transcriptional noise
Speaker 4 of 8
Ziyang Ma, Stanford University, USA
Short Talk: Prdm14 is a Sequence-Specific Transcriptional Regulator Promoting ESC Gene Expression Programs

Wednesday, January 12 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Mechanistic Nature of Epigenetic Memory
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Understood as propagation of gene expression patterns over many cell generations. A static model of epigenetic memory that relies on the stability of modification mark on a given nucleosome is dead. Instead, it becomes increasingly clear that epigenetic states are likely conveyed as a dynamic equilibrium of opposing modifying activities such as methyltransferases and demethylases that involves feedback loops.
Note that to some extent the preceding session has covered some of these topics.
There is recent theoretical work (e.g. Dodd et al., Cell 2007) that propose a dynamic model of epigenetic memory based on bistability. This model has some fascinating predictions. Unfortunately, it seems it received less attention from the field than it should (as someone put it, “biologists are a fearful bunch”).
Topics to be covered:
(i) To have a theoretical biology component, hopefully presented in a way that is accessible to biologists
(ii) To discuss existing evidence on feedback loops involving histone modifications and their integration with transcriptional networks; also discussion what is the role of transcription factors in epigenetic memory
(iii) Experimental models of epigenetic memory
(iv) Role of chromatin in dampening transcriptional noise
Speaker 5 of 8
Tasuku Kitada, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Short Talk: Deciphering the 'Epigenetic Switch' for Budding Yeast Telomere Position Effect

Wednesday, January 12 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Mechanistic Nature of Epigenetic Memory
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Understood as propagation of gene expression patterns over many cell generations. A static model of epigenetic memory that relies on the stability of modification mark on a given nucleosome is dead. Instead, it becomes increasingly clear that epigenetic states are likely conveyed as a dynamic equilibrium of opposing modifying activities such as methyltransferases and demethylases that involves feedback loops.
Note that to some extent the preceding session has covered some of these topics.
There is recent theoretical work (e.g. Dodd et al., Cell 2007) that propose a dynamic model of epigenetic memory based on bistability. This model has some fascinating predictions. Unfortunately, it seems it received less attention from the field than it should (as someone put it, “biologists are a fearful bunch”).
Topics to be covered:
(i) To have a theoretical biology component, hopefully presented in a way that is accessible to biologists
(ii) To discuss existing evidence on feedback loops involving histone modifications and their integration with transcriptional networks; also discussion what is the role of transcription factors in epigenetic memory
(iii) Experimental models of epigenetic memory
(iv) Role of chromatin in dampening transcriptional noise
Speaker 6 of 8
Yohei Hayashi, Tohoku University, Japan
Short Talk: Network-Based Histone “Modification Web” Theory and “DESS” Strategy for Elucidating the Physiological Significance of Histone Modifications

Wednesday, January 12 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Mechanistic Nature of Epigenetic Memory
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Understood as propagation of gene expression patterns over many cell generations. A static model of epigenetic memory that relies on the stability of modification mark on a given nucleosome is dead. Instead, it becomes increasingly clear that epigenetic states are likely conveyed as a dynamic equilibrium of opposing modifying activities such as methyltransferases and demethylases that involves feedback loops.
Note that to some extent the preceding session has covered some of these topics.
There is recent theoretical work (e.g. Dodd et al., Cell 2007) that propose a dynamic model of epigenetic memory based on bistability. This model has some fascinating predictions. Unfortunately, it seems it received less attention from the field than it should (as someone put it, “biologists are a fearful bunch”).
Topics to be covered:
(i) To have a theoretical biology component, hopefully presented in a way that is accessible to biologists
(ii) To discuss existing evidence on feedback loops involving histone modifications and their integration with transcriptional networks; also discussion what is the role of transcription factors in epigenetic memory
(iii) Experimental models of epigenetic memory
(iv) Role of chromatin in dampening transcriptional noise
Speaker 7 of 8
William H. Light, Northwestern University, USA
Short Talk: Interaction of a DNA Zip Code with the Nuclear Pore Complex Promotes H2A.Z Incorporation and Transcriptional Memory

Wednesday, January 12 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Mechanistic Nature of Epigenetic Memory
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Understood as propagation of gene expression patterns over many cell generations. A static model of epigenetic memory that relies on the stability of modification mark on a given nucleosome is dead. Instead, it becomes increasingly clear that epigenetic states are likely conveyed as a dynamic equilibrium of opposing modifying activities such as methyltransferases and demethylases that involves feedback loops.
Note that to some extent the preceding session has covered some of these topics.
There is recent theoretical work (e.g. Dodd et al., Cell 2007) that propose a dynamic model of epigenetic memory based on bistability. This model has some fascinating predictions. Unfortunately, it seems it received less attention from the field than it should (as someone put it, “biologists are a fearful bunch”).
Topics to be covered:
(i) To have a theoretical biology component, hopefully presented in a way that is accessible to biologists
(ii) To discuss existing evidence on feedback loops involving histone modifications and their integration with transcriptional networks; also discussion what is the role of transcription factors in epigenetic memory
(iii) Experimental models of epigenetic memory
(iv) Role of chromatin in dampening transcriptional noise
Speaker 8 of 8
Steven Henikoff, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, USA
Histone Variant Dynamics and Epigenetics

Wednesday, January 12 | 9:20AM - 9:40AM
Coffee Break
Room: Matterhorn Foyer


Wednesday, January 12 | 11:15AM - 1:00PM
Poster Setup
Room: Bernese Event Center


Wednesday, January 12 | 1:00PM - 10:00PM
Poster Viewing
Room: Bernese Event Center


Wednesday, January 12 | 1:00PM - 1:00PM
On Own for Lunch and Recreation


Wednesday, January 12 | 2:30PM - 4:30PM
Workshop 1: Hot Topics
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 1 of 8
* James R. Davie, University of Manitoba, Canada

Wednesday, January 12 | 2:30PM - 4:30PM
Workshop 1: Hot Topics
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 2 of 8
Samuel G. Cox, University of Southern California, USA
A Dominant Variant Histone H3.3 Mutant Reveals a Unique Epigenetic Remodeling Event in the Specification of the Multipotent Cranial Neural Crest

Wednesday, January 12 | 2:30PM - 4:30PM
Workshop 1: Hot Topics
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 3 of 8
Alexandre M. Erkine, Butler University, USA
Activator - Histone Interactions: Fact or Fiction?

Wednesday, January 12 | 2:30PM - 4:30PM
Workshop 1: Hot Topics
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 4 of 8
Alea A. Mills, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, USA
PHD-mediated H3K4me0 Binding is Essential for the Tumor Suppressive Function of CHD5

Wednesday, January 12 | 2:30PM - 4:30PM
Workshop 1: Hot Topics
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 5 of 8
Mekonnen Lemma Dechassa, Colorado State University, USA
Structure and Scm3 Mediated Assembly of Budding Yeast Centromeric Nucleosomes

Wednesday, January 12 | 2:30PM - 4:30PM
Workshop 1: Hot Topics
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 6 of 8
Yamini Dalal, NCI, National Institutes of Health, USA
Centromeric Histone H3 Dynamics in Human Disease, Differentiation and Repair

Wednesday, January 12 | 2:30PM - 4:30PM
Workshop 1: Hot Topics
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 7 of 8
Jun Liu, Indiana University Bloomington, USA
Is there a Histone Code for Origins of DNA Replication?

Wednesday, January 12 | 2:30PM - 4:30PM
Workshop 1: Hot Topics
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 8 of 8
Vamsi Gangaraju, Medical University of South Carolina, USA
Drosophila Piwi Functions in Hsp90-Mediated Suppression of Phenotypic Variation

Wednesday, January 12 | 4:30PM - 5:00PM
Coffee Available
Room: Matterhorn Foyer


Wednesday, January 12 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Epigenomics and Roadmaps
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 1 of 5
* Yang Shi, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, USA

Wednesday, January 12 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Epigenomics and Roadmaps
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 2 of 5
Laurie A. Boyer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Chromatin States and Cell Fate: A Role for H2A.Z

Wednesday, January 12 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Epigenomics and Roadmaps
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 3 of 5
James R. Davie, University of Manitoba, Canada
Nucleosomal Response and Immediate-Early Gene Expression

Wednesday, January 12 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Epigenomics and Roadmaps
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 4 of 5
B. Franklin Pugh, Pennsylvania State University, USA
Nucleosome Organization, Modifications States, and Gene Regulation during a Yeast Developmental Pathway

Wednesday, January 12 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Epigenomics and Roadmaps
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 5 of 5
Zhanxin Wang, Beijing Normal University, China
Short Talk: Structural Insights into a PHD-Bromo Double “Reader” Domain in Recognizing Histone Modifications

Wednesday, January 12 | 7:00PM - 8:00PM
Social Hour with Lite Bites
Room: Bernese Event Center


Wednesday, January 12 | 7:30PM - 10:00PM
Poster Session 2
Room: Bernese Event Center


Thursday, January 13 | 6:30AM - 8:00AM
Breakfast
Room: Bernese Event Center


Thursday, January 13 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Histone Modifications and Chromatin Structural Impact
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Up to now we have heard about epigenetic processes, their reversibility, epigenetic mechanisms and epigenomic roadmaps, now it is time to see how this information plays out.
(i) What do histone modifications really do to nucleosome / chromatin structure and stability / interaction with chromatin architectural proteins?
(ii) Code readers, emphasis on recognition and perhaps its combinatorial aspects
Speaker 1 of 7
* Danesh Moazed, Harvard Medical School, USA

Thursday, January 13 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Histone Modifications and Chromatin Structural Impact
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Up to now we have heard about epigenetic processes, their reversibility, epigenetic mechanisms and epigenomic roadmaps, now it is time to see how this information plays out.
(i) What do histone modifications really do to nucleosome / chromatin structure and stability / interaction with chromatin architectural proteins?
(ii) Code readers, emphasis on recognition and perhaps its combinatorial aspects
Speaker 2 of 7
Michael Guy Poirier, Ohio State University, USA
Unlocking Nucleosome Dynamics and Remodeling with Histone Post-Translational Modifications

Thursday, January 13 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Histone Modifications and Chromatin Structural Impact
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Up to now we have heard about epigenetic processes, their reversibility, epigenetic mechanisms and epigenomic roadmaps, now it is time to see how this information plays out.
(i) What do histone modifications really do to nucleosome / chromatin structure and stability / interaction with chromatin architectural proteins?
(ii) Code readers, emphasis on recognition and perhaps its combinatorial aspects
Speaker 3 of 7
David John Tremethick, Australian National University, Australia
The Nucleosome Surface Regulates Chromatin Compaction and Couples it with Unique Functions

Thursday, January 13 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Histone Modifications and Chromatin Structural Impact
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Up to now we have heard about epigenetic processes, their reversibility, epigenetic mechanisms and epigenomic roadmaps, now it is time to see how this information plays out.
(i) What do histone modifications really do to nucleosome / chromatin structure and stability / interaction with chromatin architectural proteins?
(ii) Code readers, emphasis on recognition and perhaps its combinatorial aspects
Speaker 4 of 7
Job Dekker, University of Massachusetts Medical School, USA
Three-Dimensional Organization of Chromosomes

Thursday, January 13 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Histone Modifications and Chromatin Structural Impact
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Up to now we have heard about epigenetic processes, their reversibility, epigenetic mechanisms and epigenomic roadmaps, now it is time to see how this information plays out.
(i) What do histone modifications really do to nucleosome / chromatin structure and stability / interaction with chromatin architectural proteins?
(ii) Code readers, emphasis on recognition and perhaps its combinatorial aspects
Speaker 5 of 7
Judith B. Zaugg, EMBL-EBI, UK
Short Talk: A Four State Model of Promoter-Nucleosome Architecture

Thursday, January 13 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Histone Modifications and Chromatin Structural Impact
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Up to now we have heard about epigenetic processes, their reversibility, epigenetic mechanisms and epigenomic roadmaps, now it is time to see how this information plays out.
(i) What do histone modifications really do to nucleosome / chromatin structure and stability / interaction with chromatin architectural proteins?
(ii) Code readers, emphasis on recognition and perhaps its combinatorial aspects
Speaker 6 of 7
Steven M. Johnson, Brigham Young University, USA
Short Talk: Nucleosome Organization in Primary Human Cells

Thursday, January 13 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Histone Modifications and Chromatin Structural Impact
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Up to now we have heard about epigenetic processes, their reversibility, epigenetic mechanisms and epigenomic roadmaps, now it is time to see how this information plays out.
(i) What do histone modifications really do to nucleosome / chromatin structure and stability / interaction with chromatin architectural proteins?
(ii) Code readers, emphasis on recognition and perhaps its combinatorial aspects
Speaker 7 of 7
Karolin Luger, University of Colorado Boulder, USA
Intrinsic and Extrinsic Modulators of Chromatin Structure

Thursday, January 13 | 9:20AM - 9:40AM
Coffee Break
Room: Matterhorn Foyer


Thursday, January 13 | 11:15AM - 1:00PM
Poster Setup
Room: Bernese Event Center


Thursday, January 13 | 1:00PM - 10:00PM
Poster Viewing
Room: Bernese Event Center


Thursday, January 13 | 1:00PM - 1:00PM
On Own for Lunch and Recreation


Thursday, January 13 | 4:30PM - 5:00PM
Coffee Available
Room: Matterhorn Foyer


Thursday, January 13 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Combinatorial Readout of Histone PTMs
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 1 of 5
* Karolin Luger, University of Colorado Boulder, USA

Thursday, January 13 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Combinatorial Readout of Histone PTMs
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 2 of 5
Michael A. Shogren-Knaak, Iowa State University, USA
Writing and Reading SAGA Autoacetylation in the Context of Nucleosome Acetylation

Thursday, January 13 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Combinatorial Readout of Histone PTMs
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 3 of 5
Or P. Gozani, Stanford University, USA
Role of NSD2/MMSET in Chromatin Regulation and Oncogenic Programming

Thursday, January 13 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Combinatorial Readout of Histone PTMs
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 4 of 5
Tatiana G. Kutateladze, University of Colorado School of Medicine, USA
Structural Insights into Histone Code Recognition by PHD Fingers

Thursday, January 13 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Combinatorial Readout of Histone PTMs
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 5 of 5
Brian D. Strahl, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA
Short Talk: Targeting the Histone Code Hypothesis via Peptide Arrays

Thursday, January 13 | 7:00PM - 8:00PM
Social Hour with Lite Bites
Room: Bernese Event Center


Thursday, January 13 | 7:30PM - 10:00PM
Poster Session 3
Room: Bernese Event Center


Friday, January 14 | 6:30AM - 8:00AM
Breakfast
Room: Bernese Event Center


Friday, January 14 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Dynamics of Histone Modifications and Chromosomal Organizati
on

Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Discuss how responsive the epigenetic process is and how we need to think in three dimensional terms when considering the interplay in the nuclear environment that ultimately decides which gene will be fired up. This will be important to consider as ChIP, ChIP-seq or any other high powered ChIP protocol is dealing with averaging information from multiple alleles (in the case of cancer cells) and lots of cells. This illustrates the limitation of our current approaches and how we are missing the richness and diversity of how each cell configures both or single alleles.
Speaker 1 of 7
* Nicole J. Francis, Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal, Canada

Friday, January 14 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Dynamics of Histone Modifications and Chromosomal Organizati
on

Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Discuss how responsive the epigenetic process is and how we need to think in three dimensional terms when considering the interplay in the nuclear environment that ultimately decides which gene will be fired up. This will be important to consider as ChIP, ChIP-seq or any other high powered ChIP protocol is dealing with averaging information from multiple alleles (in the case of cancer cells) and lots of cells. This illustrates the limitation of our current approaches and how we are missing the richness and diversity of how each cell configures both or single alleles.
Speaker 2 of 7
Yang Shi, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, USA
Histone Demethylation

Friday, January 14 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Dynamics of Histone Modifications and Chromosomal Organizati
on

Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Discuss how responsive the epigenetic process is and how we need to think in three dimensional terms when considering the interplay in the nuclear environment that ultimately decides which gene will be fired up. This will be important to consider as ChIP, ChIP-seq or any other high powered ChIP protocol is dealing with averaging information from multiple alleles (in the case of cancer cells) and lots of cells. This illustrates the limitation of our current approaches and how we are missing the richness and diversity of how each cell configures both or single alleles.
Speaker 3 of 7
Dimitris Thanos, BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH FOUNDATION ACADEMY OF ATHENS, Greece
Mechanisms of Stochastic Gene Expression

Friday, January 14 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Dynamics of Histone Modifications and Chromosomal Organizati
on

Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Discuss how responsive the epigenetic process is and how we need to think in three dimensional terms when considering the interplay in the nuclear environment that ultimately decides which gene will be fired up. This will be important to consider as ChIP, ChIP-seq or any other high powered ChIP protocol is dealing with averaging information from multiple alleles (in the case of cancer cells) and lots of cells. This illustrates the limitation of our current approaches and how we are missing the richness and diversity of how each cell configures both or single alleles.
Speaker 4 of 7
Scott D. Briggs, Purdue University, USA
Small Protein Motifs Required for Histone Methylation

Friday, January 14 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Dynamics of Histone Modifications and Chromosomal Organizati
on

Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Discuss how responsive the epigenetic process is and how we need to think in three dimensional terms when considering the interplay in the nuclear environment that ultimately decides which gene will be fired up. This will be important to consider as ChIP, ChIP-seq or any other high powered ChIP protocol is dealing with averaging information from multiple alleles (in the case of cancer cells) and lots of cells. This illustrates the limitation of our current approaches and how we are missing the richness and diversity of how each cell configures both or single alleles.
Speaker 5 of 7
Paolo Sassone-Corsi, University of California, Irvine, USA
Joining the Dots: Epigenetics, Metabolism and the Circadian Clock

Friday, January 14 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Dynamics of Histone Modifications and Chromosomal Organizati
on

Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Discuss how responsive the epigenetic process is and how we need to think in three dimensional terms when considering the interplay in the nuclear environment that ultimately decides which gene will be fired up. This will be important to consider as ChIP, ChIP-seq or any other high powered ChIP protocol is dealing with averaging information from multiple alleles (in the case of cancer cells) and lots of cells. This illustrates the limitation of our current approaches and how we are missing the richness and diversity of how each cell configures both or single alleles.
Speaker 6 of 7
William J. Belden, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, USA
Short Talk: Examining the Role of Histone Crosstalk in Circadian Regulated Gene Expression

Friday, January 14 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Dynamics of Histone Modifications and Chromosomal Organizati
on

Room: Matterhorn Ballroom
Discuss how responsive the epigenetic process is and how we need to think in three dimensional terms when considering the interplay in the nuclear environment that ultimately decides which gene will be fired up. This will be important to consider as ChIP, ChIP-seq or any other high powered ChIP protocol is dealing with averaging information from multiple alleles (in the case of cancer cells) and lots of cells. This illustrates the limitation of our current approaches and how we are missing the richness and diversity of how each cell configures both or single alleles.
Speaker 7 of 7
Ali Shilatifard, Northwestern University, USA
Short Talk: Histone H3K79 Methylation as an Epigenetic code for
Telomere-Associated Gene Silencing


Friday, January 14 | 9:20AM - 9:40AM
Coffee Break
Room: Matterhorn Foyer


Friday, January 14 | 11:15AM - 11:15AM
On Own for Lunch and Recreation


Friday, January 14 | 2:30PM - 4:30PM
Workshop 2: Navigating Epigenetic Landscapes
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 1 of 8
* Tatiana G. Kutateladze, University of Colorado School of Medicine, USA

Friday, January 14 | 2:30PM - 4:30PM
Workshop 2: Navigating Epigenetic Landscapes
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 2 of 8
Alf Herzig, Max-Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Germany
A Genetic System to Assess Functions of Higher Eukaryote Histones and Histone Modifications in vivo

Friday, January 14 | 2:30PM - 4:30PM
Workshop 2: Navigating Epigenetic Landscapes
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 3 of 8
Duy P. Nguyen, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, UK
Genetically Encoding Post-Translational Modifications in Recombinant Histones

Friday, January 14 | 2:30PM - 4:30PM
Workshop 2: Navigating Epigenetic Landscapes
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 4 of 8
Shohei Koide, New York University Langone Health, USA
Designer Affinity Reagents for Histone Marks

Friday, January 14 | 2:30PM - 4:30PM
Workshop 2: Navigating Epigenetic Landscapes
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 5 of 8
Peter V. Kharchenko, Harvard Medical School, USA
Characterization of D. melanogaster Chromatin Landscape

Friday, January 14 | 2:30PM - 4:30PM
Workshop 2: Navigating Epigenetic Landscapes
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 6 of 8
Peter J. Brown, University of Toronto, Canada
Discovery of Epigenetic Chemical Probes

Friday, January 14 | 2:30PM - 4:30PM
Workshop 2: Navigating Epigenetic Landscapes
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 7 of 8
Menzies Chen, Illumina, Inc., USA
A Systematic Position-Effect Screen for Interrogating Epigenetic-Genetic Interactions

Friday, January 14 | 2:30PM - 4:30PM
Workshop 2: Navigating Epigenetic Landscapes
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 8 of 8
Paul D. Soloway, Cornell University, USA
Single Molecule Chromatin Analysis

Friday, January 14 | 4:30PM - 5:00PM
Coffee Available
Room: Matterhorn Foyer


Friday, January 14 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Histone Code: Fact or Fiction? - The Debate
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 1 of 5
* Barbara Panning, University of California, San Francisco, USA

Friday, January 14 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Histone Code: Fact or Fiction? - The Debate
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 2 of 5
* Steven Henikoff, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, USA

Friday, January 14 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Histone Code: Fact or Fiction? - The Debate
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 3 of 5
* Ali Shilatifard, Northwestern University, USA

Friday, January 14 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Histone Code: Fact or Fiction? - The Debate
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 4 of 5
* Alexander J. Ruthenburg, University of Chicago, USA

Friday, January 14 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
Histone Code: Fact or Fiction? - The Debate
Room: Matterhorn Ballroom

Speaker 5 of 5
* Bryan M. Turner, University of Birmingham, UK

Friday, January 14 | 7:00PM - 8:00PM
Social Hour with Lite Bites
Room: Bernese Event Center


Friday, January 14 | 8:00PM - 11:00PM
Entertainment
Room: Bernese Event Center


Friday, January 14 | 8:00PM - 11:00PM
Cash Bar
Room: Bernese Event Center


Saturday, January 15 | 10:22AM - 10:22AM
Departure


*Session Chair
†Invited, not yet responded.