Web Desc
Epithelial Plasticity and Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition
Organizer(s): Rik Derynck, Harold A. Chapman and Raymond Runyan
Date: January 21 - 26, 2011
Location: Fairmont Waterfront, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Supported by the Directors' Fund
For important information on the coronavirus, please click here
Summary of Meeting:
Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a basic cellular process in which epithelial cells lose epithelial properties, e.g. their polarized organization and cell-cell junctions, undergo changes in cytoskeleton and cell shape, acquire mesenchymal characteristics and become migratory and invasive. EMT was first recognized as distinct cell differentiation process in the late 70’s, and has received increasing attention, as it not only occurs in normal development but is also an integral component of various pathological conditions. An increasing understanding of the signaling and transcription processes that mediate EMT is starting to provide a framework of the underlying molecular mechanisms. During development, EMT occurs as early as gastrulation, when ectodermal cells give rise to mesoderm. In addition, embryonic stem cells in culture are epithelial in nature and, during colony formation, rapidly give rise to niche cells that lack epithelial characteristic and appear mesenchymal. EMT is reiterated at different stages and in different developmental contexts. Notably, neural crest cells delaminate and migrate to give rise to various mesenchymal cell populations. In addition, EMT occurs at distinct sites and stages in organogenesis, e.g. in the heart and pancreas. Conversely, mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) also occurs and may account for the reversal of cells that have undergone EMT back to the epithelial phenotype, illustrating the potential of EMT to be a transient and reversible process. Finally, it has become increasingly apparent that endothelial cells, similarly to epithelial cells, can lose endothelial characteristics and acquire mesenchymal properties. EMT has also been recognized as an important component of pathological conditions, and contributes to cancer progression, specifically invasion and metastasis of cancers, and fibrosis. While the contributions of EMT to cancer progression and fibrosis are debated, epithelial cells have been shown to undergo EMT in vivo under pathological conditions. In addition, in response to injury, epithelial cells reversibly lose epithelial characteristics and become migratory, illustrating the plasticity of the epithelial cells in wound healing. Studies on EMT have greatly benefited from the discovery that some growth and differentiation factors, most notably FGFs and HGF that act through receptor tyrosine kinases, and members of the TGF-beta family can induce EMT both in cell culture and in vivo, and from the establishment of cell culture models. These studies have provided great impetus to the dissection of signaling pathways that drive or contribute to EMT. Further, the identification of distinct families of transcription factors, whose expression is activated during EMT, allows a rapidly increasing insight into the transcription programs that drive EMT. Importantly, the signaling mechanisms and transcription programs that characterize EMT during development appear to be largely recapitulated during EMT processes under pathological conditions. Although EMT has been well documented during development, there is debate about its role and contribution in pathological conditions. The transient and reversible nature of EMT in cancer progression may contribute to some aspects of this debate, as cells that have undergone EMT may revert to their epithelial differentiation state and are therefore not easily identified. Another aspect of the debate centers around the acquisition of mesenchymal properties, especially since mesenchymal characteristics are ill-defined. Furthermore, in many cases epithelial cells lose epithelial characteristics and become migratory, but do not acquire mesenchymal marker expression. These observations suggest that a spectrum of epithelial plasticity changes can occur, resulting in downregulation of epithelial differentiation and integrity to different extents, and in changes that may or may not qualify as EMT. By considering EMT as the most striking manifestation of epithelial plasticity, much of the debate on the relative contribution of EMT to disease may be moot since different degrees of epithelial plasticity are observed. For example, while EMT has been implicated in cancer invasion, increased migration and invasion of cells with epithelial characteristics has also been documented as a basis for cancer invasion and progression. As another example, the changes in epithelial differentiation and organization of mammary epithelial cells during and following pregnancy and lactation also illustrate the inherent plasticity of epithelial cells that does not need to result in EMT. Further, during epithelial wound healing, different degrees of epithelial plasticity are observed. For example, striking plasticity is displayed by the airway respiratory epithelium following injury, where rapid conversion to a squamous phenotype protects the airway surface integrity, followed by reacquisition of multiple epithelial phenotypes during recovery. Finally, the realization that EMT provides a basis for cell invasion, leading to metastasis of carcinomas or fibrosis in different organs has also stimulated interest to find therapeutic modalities to inhibit EMT that consequently may interfere with or prevent the progression of metastases or fibrosis. In cancer, these considerations are energized by recent pre-clinical and clinical evidence that VEGF inhibitors as single agents promote invasion and metastasis, adversely affecting survival, and by preclinical results indicating that TGF-beta signaling inhibitors prevent or interfere with invasion and metastasis. Already, several recent clinical trials with antibodies and small molecules target signaling pathways known to drive EMT. Purpose of the Proposed Conference: We propose a conference roster to highlight the progress in our understanding of EMT against the background of the inherent plasticity of the epithelial cells. Following a keynote address, we propose a first session that will set the stage for subsequent sessions on EMT. This first session will discuss current insights into the differentiation of epithelial cells from stem cells, the maintenance of epithelial integrity and the inherent plasticity of epithelial cells. Against this background, the next seven sessions will discuss progress in our understanding of (1) the molecular mechanisms underlying epithelial plasticity and EMT (2 sessions), (2) the roles of EMT in normal development (2 sessions), (3) the roles of EMT in cancer (2 sessions) and fibrosis (1 session), including progress toward therapies based on inhibition of EMT. We appreciate that these divisions are artificial, since e.g. mechanistic studies are often validated in the context of development, cancer or fibrosis. Nevertheless, as artificial as these three subdivisions may be, we aim to give about equal weight to the cell biology of EMT, its developmental roles and its roles in pathology. The overall subject matter of the different aspects of the proposed conference is highlighted in the Background section above and in the discussion of the individual sessions further below, to which we refer. The purpose of this conference will be to bring together scientists who work on disparate aspects of epithelial plasticity and EMT. We expect to see an integration of cell and molecular biologists, developmental biologists, cancer biologists and organ/tissue biologists. Many of these scientists may be basic scientists, yet we also expect a substantial participation by scientists with translational interest and clinician-scientists, and significant interest from pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry.
Scholarship Deadline: September 21 2010
Discounted Abstract Deadline: September 21 2010
Abstract Deadline: October 25 2010
Discounted Registration Deadline: November 22 2010
We gratefully acknowledge additional in-kind support for this conference from those foregoing speaker expense reimbursements:

Astellas Pharma Inc.
We gratefully acknowledge the generous grant for this conference provided by:

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Grant No. 1R13HL104795-01
We appreciate the organizations that provide Keystone Symposia with additional support, such as marketing and advertising:

Click here to view more of these organizations
Special thanks to the following for their support of Keystone Symposia initiatives to increase participation at this meeting by scientists from underrepresented backgrounds:

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Program

Friday, January 21 | 3:00PM - 7:30PM
Registration
Room: Waterfront Foyer


Friday, January 21 | 6:15PM - 7:15PM
Refreshments
Room: Waterfront Foyer


Friday, January 21 | 7:15PM - 8:30PM
Welcome and Keynote Address
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C

Speaker 1 of 1
Jean-Paul Thiery, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Singapore
EMT in the Progression of Carcinoma

Saturday, January 22 | 7:00AM - 8:00AM
Breakfast
Room: Mackenzie Ballroom


Saturday, January 22 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Epithelial Differentiation Plasticity
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
Epithelial cells have an inherent differentiation plasticity. Well-studied examples are the changes in epithelial phenotypes and organization in mammary gland epithelial cells during and following pregnancy and lactation, and the response of epithelial cells to injury, in which they transiently lose epithelial characteristics to then re-acquire them (as demonstrated in lung and skin epithelia). This session will also deal with how epithelial stem cells giving rise to differentiated epithelia.
Speaker 1 of 6
Yann Barrandon, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland
Deciphering Epithelial Stem Cell Potency

Saturday, January 22 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Epithelial Differentiation Plasticity
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
Epithelial cells have an inherent differentiation plasticity. Well-studied examples are the changes in epithelial phenotypes and organization in mammary gland epithelial cells during and following pregnancy and lactation, and the response of epithelial cells to injury, in which they transiently lose epithelial characteristics to then re-acquire them (as demonstrated in lung and skin epithelia). This session will also deal with how epithelial stem cells giving rise to differentiated epithelia.
Speaker 2 of 6
* Zena Werb, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition in Mammary Tumorigenesis

Saturday, January 22 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Epithelial Differentiation Plasticity
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
Epithelial cells have an inherent differentiation plasticity. Well-studied examples are the changes in epithelial phenotypes and organization in mammary gland epithelial cells during and following pregnancy and lactation, and the response of epithelial cells to injury, in which they transiently lose epithelial characteristics to then re-acquire them (as demonstrated in lung and skin epithelia). This session will also deal with how epithelial stem cells giving rise to differentiated epithelia.
Speaker 3 of 6
Jeffrey A. Whitsett, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, USA
Respiratory Epithelial Cells: Differentiation and Plasticity

Saturday, January 22 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Epithelial Differentiation Plasticity
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
Epithelial cells have an inherent differentiation plasticity. Well-studied examples are the changes in epithelial phenotypes and organization in mammary gland epithelial cells during and following pregnancy and lactation, and the response of epithelial cells to injury, in which they transiently lose epithelial characteristics to then re-acquire them (as demonstrated in lung and skin epithelia). This session will also deal with how epithelial stem cells giving rise to differentiated epithelia.
Speaker 4 of 6
Keith E. Mostov, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Epithelial Recovery from Injury and Homeostasis

Saturday, January 22 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Epithelial Differentiation Plasticity
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
Epithelial cells have an inherent differentiation plasticity. Well-studied examples are the changes in epithelial phenotypes and organization in mammary gland epithelial cells during and following pregnancy and lactation, and the response of epithelial cells to injury, in which they transiently lose epithelial characteristics to then re-acquire them (as demonstrated in lung and skin epithelia). This session will also deal with how epithelial stem cells giving rise to differentiated epithelia.
Speaker 5 of 6
Andras Kapus, Keenan Research Centre, St. Michael's Hospital, Canada
Short Talk: How does beta-catenin Regulate Epithelial-Myofibroblast Transition?

Saturday, January 22 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Epithelial Differentiation Plasticity
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
Epithelial cells have an inherent differentiation plasticity. Well-studied examples are the changes in epithelial phenotypes and organization in mammary gland epithelial cells during and following pregnancy and lactation, and the response of epithelial cells to injury, in which they transiently lose epithelial characteristics to then re-acquire them (as demonstrated in lung and skin epithelia). This session will also deal with how epithelial stem cells giving rise to differentiated epithelia.
Speaker 6 of 6
Jing Yang, University of California, San Diego, USA
Short Talk: Twist1-Induced Invadopodia Formation Promotes Tumor Metastasis

Saturday, January 22 | 9:20AM - 9:40AM
Coffee Break
Room: Waterfront Foyer


Saturday, January 22 | 11:15AM - 1:00PM
Poster Setup
Room: Waterfront Ballroom AB


Saturday, January 22 | 11:15AM - 11:15AM
On Own for Lunch and Recreation


Saturday, January 22 | 1:00PM - 10:00PM
Poster Viewing
Room: Waterfront Ballroom AB


Saturday, January 22 | 4:30PM - 5:00PM
Coffee Available
Room: Waterfront Foyer


Saturday, January 22 | 5:00PM - 7:15PM
Molecular Mechanisms: Signaling and Transcription I
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
This is the first of two sessions dealing primarily with the cell biology of loss of epithelial characteristics, EMT and associated motility and invasion. Wnt, TGF-beta family and Erk MAPK signaling are key signaling mechanisms. Furthermore, Snail, ZEB and bHLH family transcription factors play key roles in driving the changes in cell phenotype and behavior. The mechanisms and their functional interplay will be discussed.
Speaker 1 of 5
Rik Derynck, University of California, San Francisco, USA
TGF-beta-Induced Non-Smad Signaling in Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT)

Saturday, January 22 | 5:00PM - 7:15PM
Molecular Mechanisms: Signaling and Transcription I
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
This is the first of two sessions dealing primarily with the cell biology of loss of epithelial characteristics, EMT and associated motility and invasion. Wnt, TGF-beta family and Erk MAPK signaling are key signaling mechanisms. Furthermore, Snail, ZEB and bHLH family transcription factors play key roles in driving the changes in cell phenotype and behavior. The mechanisms and their functional interplay will be discussed.
Speaker 2 of 5
* Angela Nieto, Instituto de Neurociencias de Alicante, CSIC-UMH, Spain
Snail and EMT in Renal Fibrosis

Saturday, January 22 | 5:00PM - 7:15PM
Molecular Mechanisms: Signaling and Transcription I
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
This is the first of two sessions dealing primarily with the cell biology of loss of epithelial characteristics, EMT and associated motility and invasion. Wnt, TGF-beta family and Erk MAPK signaling are key signaling mechanisms. Furthermore, Snail, ZEB and bHLH family transcription factors play key roles in driving the changes in cell phenotype and behavior. The mechanisms and their functional interplay will be discussed.
Speaker 3 of 5
Gregory J. Goodall, SA Pathology, Australia
Reversible Control of Cell State by the miR-200/ZEB/TGF-beta Signaling Loop

Saturday, January 22 | 5:00PM - 7:15PM
Molecular Mechanisms: Signaling and Transcription I
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
This is the first of two sessions dealing primarily with the cell biology of loss of epithelial characteristics, EMT and associated motility and invasion. Wnt, TGF-beta family and Erk MAPK signaling are key signaling mechanisms. Furthermore, Snail, ZEB and bHLH family transcription factors play key roles in driving the changes in cell phenotype and behavior. The mechanisms and their functional interplay will be discussed.
Speaker 4 of 5
Katja Brückner, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Short Talk: A Drosophila Cell Culture Model for BMP-Induced Epithelial Plasticity

Saturday, January 22 | 5:00PM - 7:15PM
Molecular Mechanisms: Signaling and Transcription I
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
This is the first of two sessions dealing primarily with the cell biology of loss of epithelial characteristics, EMT and associated motility and invasion. Wnt, TGF-beta family and Erk MAPK signaling are key signaling mechanisms. Furthermore, Snail, ZEB and bHLH family transcription factors play key roles in driving the changes in cell phenotype and behavior. The mechanisms and their functional interplay will be discussed.
Speaker 5 of 5
Jessica R. Seifert, New York University Langone Medical Center, USA
Short Talk: The Role of Endodermal EMT during Drosophila Germ Cell Migration

Saturday, January 22 | 7:15PM - 8:15PM
Social Hour with Lite Bites
Room: Waterfront Ballroom AB


Saturday, January 22 | 7:30PM - 10:00PM
Poster Session 1
Room: Waterfront Ballroom AB


Sunday, January 23 | 7:00AM - 8:00AM
Breakfast
Room: Mackenzie Ballroom


Sunday, January 23 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
EMT in Early Development
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
Already in early development, epithelial differentiation plasticity is apparent. Embryonic stem cells are epithelial and undergo differentiation into non-epithelial niche cells. Additionally, one of the first differentiation events results in the generation of mesoderm from ectoderm. Neural crest is also a prominent example of how neuro-ectodermal cells give rise to a variety of cell types including different types of mesenchymal cells.
Speaker 1 of 6
David R. McClay, Duke University, USA
Ingression of the Skeletogenic Cells of the Sea Urchin Embryo is Driven by Task-Specific Transcription Factor Control

Sunday, January 23 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
EMT in Early Development
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
Already in early development, epithelial differentiation plasticity is apparent. Embryonic stem cells are epithelial and undergo differentiation into non-epithelial niche cells. Additionally, one of the first differentiation events results in the generation of mesoderm from ectoderm. Neural crest is also a prominent example of how neuro-ectodermal cells give rise to a variety of cell types including different types of mesenchymal cells.
Speaker 2 of 6
Christopher M. Ward, University of Manchester, UK
The Function of E-Cadherin in Embryonic Stem Cells

Sunday, January 23 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
EMT in Early Development
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
Already in early development, epithelial differentiation plasticity is apparent. Embryonic stem cells are epithelial and undergo differentiation into non-epithelial niche cells. Additionally, one of the first differentiation events results in the generation of mesoderm from ectoderm. Neural crest is also a prominent example of how neuro-ectodermal cells give rise to a variety of cell types including different types of mesenchymal cells.
Speaker 3 of 6
Raymond E. Keller, University of Virginia, USA
EMT as a Force Generating Machine During Amphibian Gastrulation: A Tale of Two Blastopores

Sunday, January 23 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
EMT in Early Development
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
Already in early development, epithelial differentiation plasticity is apparent. Embryonic stem cells are epithelial and undergo differentiation into non-epithelial niche cells. Additionally, one of the first differentiation events results in the generation of mesoderm from ectoderm. Neural crest is also a prominent example of how neuro-ectodermal cells give rise to a variety of cell types including different types of mesenchymal cells.
Speaker 4 of 6
* Marianne Bronner-Fraser, California Institute of Technology, USA
Gene Regulatory Interactions Mediating Neural Crest Emigration

Sunday, January 23 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
EMT in Early Development
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
Already in early development, epithelial differentiation plasticity is apparent. Embryonic stem cells are epithelial and undergo differentiation into non-epithelial niche cells. Additionally, one of the first differentiation events results in the generation of mesoderm from ectoderm. Neural crest is also a prominent example of how neuro-ectodermal cells give rise to a variety of cell types including different types of mesenchymal cells.
Speaker 5 of 6
Margot L.K. Williams, University of Virginia, USA
Short Talk: Mechanisms of Primitive Streak Formation in the Mouse Embryo

Sunday, January 23 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
EMT in Early Development
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
Already in early development, epithelial differentiation plasticity is apparent. Embryonic stem cells are epithelial and undergo differentiation into non-epithelial niche cells. Additionally, one of the first differentiation events results in the generation of mesoderm from ectoderm. Neural crest is also a prominent example of how neuro-ectodermal cells give rise to a variety of cell types including different types of mesenchymal cells.
Speaker 6 of 6
Rodney A. Stewart, University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Institute, USA
Short Talk: EMT Mechanisms Regulating Neural Crest Development and Metastasis in Zebrafish

Sunday, January 23 | 9:20AM - 9:40AM
Coffee Break
Room: Waterfront Foyer


Sunday, January 23 | 11:15AM - 1:00PM
Poster Setup
Room: Waterfront Ballroom AB


Sunday, January 23 | 11:15AM - 11:15AM
On Own for Lunch and Recreation


Sunday, January 23 | 1:00PM - 10:00PM
Poster Viewing
Room: Waterfront Ballroom AB


Sunday, January 23 | 4:30PM - 5:00PM
Coffee Available
Room: Waterfront Foyer


Sunday, January 23 | 5:00PM - 7:15PM
Molecular Mechanisms: Signaling and Transcription II
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
This is the second of two sessions primarily dealing with the cell biology of loss of epithelial characteristics, EMT and associated motility and invasion. Wnt, TGF-beta family and Erk MAPK signaling are key signaling mechanisms. Furthermore, Snail, ZEB and bHLH family transcription factors play key roles in driving the changes in cell phenotype and behavior. We will discuss these mechanisms and their functional interplay.
Speaker 1 of 5
Morag Park, McGill University, Canada
Met Receptor Tyrosine Kinase: Signaling to EMT and Breast Cancer

Sunday, January 23 | 5:00PM - 7:15PM
Molecular Mechanisms: Signaling and Transcription II
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
This is the second of two sessions primarily dealing with the cell biology of loss of epithelial characteristics, EMT and associated motility and invasion. Wnt, TGF-beta family and Erk MAPK signaling are key signaling mechanisms. Furthermore, Snail, ZEB and bHLH family transcription factors play key roles in driving the changes in cell phenotype and behavior. We will discuss these mechanisms and their functional interplay.
Speaker 2 of 5
* Amparo Cano Garcia, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Spain
Regulation of Epithelial Plasticity and Metastasis of Basal-Like Breast Carcinomas by Lysyl Oxidase-Like 2 (LOXL2)

Sunday, January 23 | 5:00PM - 7:15PM
Molecular Mechanisms: Signaling and Transcription II
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
This is the second of two sessions primarily dealing with the cell biology of loss of epithelial characteristics, EMT and associated motility and invasion. Wnt, TGF-beta family and Erk MAPK signaling are key signaling mechanisms. Furthermore, Snail, ZEB and bHLH family transcription factors play key roles in driving the changes in cell phenotype and behavior. We will discuss these mechanisms and their functional interplay.
Speaker 3 of 5
Aristidis Moustakas, Uppsala University, Sweden
Regulation of Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition by Signaling Mediators under the Control of TGFbeta

Sunday, January 23 | 5:00PM - 7:15PM
Molecular Mechanisms: Signaling and Transcription II
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
This is the second of two sessions primarily dealing with the cell biology of loss of epithelial characteristics, EMT and associated motility and invasion. Wnt, TGF-beta family and Erk MAPK signaling are key signaling mechanisms. Furthermore, Snail, ZEB and bHLH family transcription factors play key roles in driving the changes in cell phenotype and behavior. We will discuss these mechanisms and their functional interplay.
Speaker 4 of 5
Matthias Nees, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Finland
Short Talk: Epithelial Plasticity, GPCRs & Bioactive Lipids in Prostate Cancer

Sunday, January 23 | 5:00PM - 7:15PM
Molecular Mechanisms: Signaling and Transcription II
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
This is the second of two sessions primarily dealing with the cell biology of loss of epithelial characteristics, EMT and associated motility and invasion. Wnt, TGF-beta family and Erk MAPK signaling are key signaling mechanisms. Furthermore, Snail, ZEB and bHLH family transcription factors play key roles in driving the changes in cell phenotype and behavior. We will discuss these mechanisms and their functional interplay.
Speaker 5 of 5
Manti Guha, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Short Talk: Mitochondrial Retrograde Stress Signaling Induces an Epithelial to Mesenchymal Like Transition

Sunday, January 23 | 7:15PM - 8:15PM
Social Hour with Lite Bites
Room: Waterfront Ballroom AB


Sunday, January 23 | 7:30PM - 10:00PM
Poster Session 2
Room: Waterfront Ballroom AB


Monday, January 24 | 7:00AM - 8:00AM
Breakfast
Room: Mackenzie Ballroom


Monday, January 24 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Epithelial Plasticity in Cancer
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
As epithelial cells become transformed and tumorigenic, they exhibit epithelial plasticity, giving rise to metaplasia, and eventually become invasive and undergo EMT. The role of EMT in invasion and metastasis will be discussed. This session will also discuss the role of EMT in the acquisition of a cancer stem cell phenotype.
Speaker 1 of 6
* Robert A. Weinberg, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
EMT and Cancer Stem Cells

Monday, January 24 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Epithelial Plasticity in Cancer
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
As epithelial cells become transformed and tumorigenic, they exhibit epithelial plasticity, giving rise to metaplasia, and eventually become invasive and undergo EMT. The role of EMT in invasion and metastasis will be discussed. This session will also discuss the role of EMT in the acquisition of a cancer stem cell phenotype.
Speaker 2 of 6
John Condeelis, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, USA
Molecular Mechanisms of EMT that also Contribute to Metastasis in Breast Tumors

Monday, January 24 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Epithelial Plasticity in Cancer
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
As epithelial cells become transformed and tumorigenic, they exhibit epithelial plasticity, giving rise to metaplasia, and eventually become invasive and undergo EMT. The role of EMT in invasion and metastasis will be discussed. This session will also discuss the role of EMT in the acquisition of a cancer stem cell phenotype.
Speaker 3 of 6
Derek Radisky, Mayo Clinic, USA
Rac1b and Matrix Metalloproteinase-induced EMT in Lung Fibrosis and Cancer

Monday, January 24 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Epithelial Plasticity in Cancer
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
As epithelial cells become transformed and tumorigenic, they exhibit epithelial plasticity, giving rise to metaplasia, and eventually become invasive and undergo EMT. The role of EMT in invasion and metastasis will be discussed. This session will also discuss the role of EMT in the acquisition of a cancer stem cell phenotype.
Speaker 4 of 6
David M. Epstein, Duke NUS, Graduate Medical School Singapore, Singapore
EMT in Context of Cancer Therapy

Monday, January 24 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Epithelial Plasticity in Cancer
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
As epithelial cells become transformed and tumorigenic, they exhibit epithelial plasticity, giving rise to metaplasia, and eventually become invasive and undergo EMT. The role of EMT in invasion and metastasis will be discussed. This session will also discuss the role of EMT in the acquisition of a cancer stem cell phenotype.
Speaker 5 of 6
David Dornan, Genentech, Inc., USA
Short Talk: TRPS1 Targeting by miR-221/222 Promotes the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Breast Cancer

Monday, January 24 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
Epithelial Plasticity in Cancer
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
As epithelial cells become transformed and tumorigenic, they exhibit epithelial plasticity, giving rise to metaplasia, and eventually become invasive and undergo EMT. The role of EMT in invasion and metastasis will be discussed. This session will also discuss the role of EMT in the acquisition of a cancer stem cell phenotype.
Speaker 6 of 6
L. Eric Huang, University of Utah, USA
Short Talk: Long-term Hypoxia Promotes A Perpetual Mesenchymal Phenotype via Genetic Alterations for Malignant Progression

Monday, January 24 | 9:20AM - 9:40AM
Coffee Break
Room: Waterfront Foyer


Monday, January 24 | 11:15AM - 11:15AM
On Own for Lunch and Recreation


Monday, January 24 | 2:30PM - 3:00PM
Coffee Available
Room: Waterfront Foyer


Monday, January 24 | 3:00PM - 5:15PM
EMT in Tissue Differentiation
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
This session is a continuation of session 3, but focusing on other and perhaps later aspects of development, in particular in organ systems. Endothelial to mesenchymal differentiation will be discussed, in addition to developmental EMT in heart, pancreas and lung.
Speaker 1 of 6
Peter ten Dijke, Leiden University Medical Center, Netherlands
TGF-beta Signaling in Breast Cancer Cell Invasion & Endothelial to Mesenchymal Transition

Monday, January 24 | 3:00PM - 5:15PM
EMT in Tissue Differentiation
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
This session is a continuation of session 3, but focusing on other and perhaps later aspects of development, in particular in organ systems. Endothelial to mesenchymal differentiation will be discussed, in addition to developmental EMT in heart, pancreas and lung.
Speaker 2 of 6
* Raymond Runyan, University of Arizona, USA
Runx2-1 and Noelin1 are Essential Components of EMT in the Embryonic Heart

Monday, January 24 | 3:00PM - 5:15PM
EMT in Tissue Differentiation
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
This session is a continuation of session 3, but focusing on other and perhaps later aspects of development, in particular in organ systems. Endothelial to mesenchymal differentiation will be discussed, in addition to developmental EMT in heart, pancreas and lung.
Speaker 3 of 6
Ulrich Tepass, University of Toronto, Canada
Short Talk: Enhanced Requirement to Stabilize Epithelial Polarity and Adherens Junctions Results from EMT-Induced Morphogenetic Stress

Monday, January 24 | 3:00PM - 5:15PM
EMT in Tissue Differentiation
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
This session is a continuation of session 3, but focusing on other and perhaps later aspects of development, in particular in organ systems. Endothelial to mesenchymal differentiation will be discussed, in addition to developmental EMT in heart, pancreas and lung.
Speaker 4 of 6
Silva Krause, Momenta Pharmaceuticals, USA
Short Talk: Embryonic Mesenchyme is Able to Revert the Mammary Cancer Cell Phenotype

Monday, January 24 | 3:00PM - 5:15PM
EMT in Tissue Differentiation
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
This session is a continuation of session 3, but focusing on other and perhaps later aspects of development, in particular in organ systems. Endothelial to mesenchymal differentiation will be discussed, in addition to developmental EMT in heart, pancreas and lung.
Speaker 5 of 6
Qihong Huang, Wistar Institute, USA
Short Talk: Functional Genomics Screen for the Regulators of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Metastasis

Monday, January 24 | 3:00PM - 5:15PM
EMT in Tissue Differentiation
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
This session is a continuation of session 3, but focusing on other and perhaps later aspects of development, in particular in organ systems. Endothelial to mesenchymal differentiation will be discussed, in addition to developmental EMT in heart, pancreas and lung.
Speaker 6 of 6
Odile Filhol, INSERM, France
Short Talk: Unbalanced Expression of Protein Kinase CK2 Subunits Induces Epithelial -to -Mesenchymal Transition and Contributes to Stemness

Monday, January 24 | 5:15PM - 6:15PM
Social Hour with Lite Bites
Room: Waterfront Ballroom AB


Tuesday, January 25 | 7:00AM - 8:00AM
Breakfast
Room: Mackenzie Ballroom


Tuesday, January 25 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
EMT in Fibrosis
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
The roles of epithelial plasticity and EMT in tissue fibrosis, with particular emphasis on lung, liver and kidney fibrosis, will be discussed. This session will incorporate information on possible therapeutic approaches.
Speaker 1 of 6
Harold A. Chapman, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Regulation of EMT by Integrins

Tuesday, January 25 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
EMT in Fibrosis
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
The roles of epithelial plasticity and EMT in tissue fibrosis, with particular emphasis on lung, liver and kidney fibrosis, will be discussed. This session will incorporate information on possible therapeutic approaches.
Speaker 2 of 6
* Anna Mae Diehl, Duke University, USA
Hedgehog Pathway Activation Promotes Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transitions and Other Events that Expand Myofibroblast Populations in Injured Livers

Tuesday, January 25 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
EMT in Fibrosis
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
The roles of epithelial plasticity and EMT in tissue fibrosis, with particular emphasis on lung, liver and kidney fibrosis, will be discussed. This session will incorporate information on possible therapeutic approaches.
Speaker 3 of 6
Raghu Kalluri, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, USA
Kidney Fibrosis: The Biology of Fibroblasts and the Role of ALK3 and BMP-7

Tuesday, January 25 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
EMT in Fibrosis
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
The roles of epithelial plasticity and EMT in tissue fibrosis, with particular emphasis on lung, liver and kidney fibrosis, will be discussed. This session will incorporate information on possible therapeutic approaches.
Speaker 4 of 6
Volker H. Haase, Vanderbilt University, USA
Hypoxic Signaling in the Development of Kidney Fibrosis

Tuesday, January 25 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
EMT in Fibrosis
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
The roles of epithelial plasticity and EMT in tissue fibrosis, with particular emphasis on lung, liver and kidney fibrosis, will be discussed. This session will incorporate information on possible therapeutic approaches.
Speaker 5 of 6
Damian Medici, Harvard Medical School, USA
Short Talk: Role of Endothelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Heterotopic Ossification

Tuesday, January 25 | 8:00AM - 11:15AM
EMT in Fibrosis
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
The roles of epithelial plasticity and EMT in tissue fibrosis, with particular emphasis on lung, liver and kidney fibrosis, will be discussed. This session will incorporate information on possible therapeutic approaches.
Speaker 6 of 6
Melody L. Stallings-Mann, Mayo Clinic, USA
Short Talk: Matrix Metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) Induces Epithelial Cell Activation and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition during Lung Fibrosis Development

Tuesday, January 25 | 9:20AM - 9:40AM
Coffee Break
Room: Waterfront Foyer


Tuesday, January 25 | 11:15AM - 11:15AM
On Own for Lunch and Recreation


Tuesday, January 25 | 4:30PM - 5:00PM
Coffee Available
Room: Waterfront Foyer


Tuesday, January 25 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
EMT in Cancer Invasion and Metastasis
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
This session is a continuation of session 5. The role of epithelial plasticity in cancer dissemination and metastasis will be discussed, as will information on possible therapeutic approaches.
Speaker 1 of 3
Shoukat Dedhar, British Columbia Cancer Research Centre, Canada
Tumor Hypoxia, Metastasis and Plasticity of Cancer Stem Cells: Critical Role of Carbonic Anhydrase IX, a HIF Induced pH Regulator

Tuesday, January 25 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
EMT in Cancer Invasion and Metastasis
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
This session is a continuation of session 5. The role of epithelial plasticity in cancer dissemination and metastasis will be discussed, as will information on possible therapeutic approaches.
Speaker 2 of 3
* Kohei Miyazono, University of Tokyo, Japan
TGF-beta, EMT and TGF-beta Signaling Inhibitors in Cancer Progression

Tuesday, January 25 | 5:00PM - 7:00PM
EMT in Cancer Invasion and Metastasis
Room: Waterfront Ballroom C
This session is a continuation of session 5. The role of epithelial plasticity in cancer dissemination and metastasis will be discussed, as will information on possible therapeutic approaches.
Speaker 3 of 3
Rik Thompson, St. Vincent's Institute of Medical Research, Australia
Epithelial Mesenchymal Plasticity in Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines: The Path Forward?

Tuesday, January 25 | 7:00PM - 8:00PM
Social Hour with Lite Bites
Room: Waterfront Ballroom AB


Tuesday, January 25 | 8:00PM - 11:00PM
Entertainment
Room: Waterfront Ballroom AB


Tuesday, January 25 | 8:00PM - 11:00PM
Cash Bar
Room: Waterfront Ballroom AB


Wednesday, January 26 | 10:22AM - 10:22AM
Departure


*Session Chair
†Invited, not yet responded.