This meeting took place in the past. For a complete list of the meetings for the upcoming/current season, see our meeting list or click on related meetings tab below to check for related meeting(s).
Web Desc
Islet and Beta Cell Biology
joint with Islet and Beta Cell Development and Transplantation
Organizer(s): Christopher B. Newgard, Frances M. Ashcroft and Roland W. Stein
Date: April 06 - 11, 2008
Location: Snowbird Resort, Snowbird, UT, USA
Supported by the Director's Fund
Summary of Meeting:
Despite many decades of research, important aspects of the molecular, biochemical and metabolic mechanisms that control the function of the islets of Langerhans have remained unresolved, due in part to the sequestration of these cells in the bowels of the exocrine pancreas. Nevertheless the key role of the islets in the pathogenesis of both major forms of diabetes has maintained the resolve of islet investigators at a high level, and has led to recent full-scale application of the tools of genetics, transcriptomics, genetic engineering, metabolomics, and informatics for understanding of normal islets and their loss of function in diabetes. Major progress has occurred in understanding of transcriptional networks that control islet function, growth and survival, and revealed that several factors thought of previously only as regulators of beta-cell development (e.g. Nkx6.1, Nkx2.2, Foxa1, Foxa2, MafA) are also key modulators of adult beta-cell function and growth. In addition, merger of genetic and metabolic analysis tools have allowed major inroads into identification of mitochondrially-derived mediators of insulin secretion that complement the classical KATP-channel dependent pathway. Finally, genetic studies have identified new diabetes candidate genes (e.g., the transcription factor Tcf712) that appear to play important roles in the islets—this field is just emerging and will likely be a cresting wave at the time of this proposed meeting. Major remaining problems are to test hypotheses about key genes and pathways emerging from application of 'omics' technologies to islet research, and the identification of attractive targets for improving islet function and survival in both major forms of diabetes. The key meeting goals are: • To provide a forum for investigators of the field to hear of the latest insights from application of state-of-the-art technologies to the islet field. • To allow islet biologists to hear new findings from the areas of transcription factor biology, metabolism, intracellular trafficking and signaling, and drug target identification leading to synthesis of new and integrated ideas. • To provide stimulation and inspiration for young scientists who are training in the field via the opportunity to interact freely with senior scientists and present their own work in invited abstract talks and posters.
Scholarship Deadline: December 6 2007
Discounted Abstract Deadline: December 6 2007
Abstract Deadline: January 9 2008
Discounted Registration Deadline: February 6 2008
We gratefully acknowledge additional support for this conference from:
JDRF
We gratefully acknowledge the generous grant for this conference provided by:

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Grant No. 5R13DK076500-02
We appreciate the organizations that provide Keystone Symposia with additional support, such as marketing and advertising:

Click here to view more of these organizations
Special thanks to the following for their support of Keystone Symposia initiatives to increase participation at this meeting by scientists from underrepresented backgrounds:

Click here to view more of these organizations

No content found

No content found

No content found

No content found