Program Accomplishments Archive


FY17 Program Accomplishments


Keystone Symposia's FY17 year (July 2016 — June 2017) featured 60 conferences across a diverse range of the life sciences that attracted the participation of 13,864 scientists from 90 countries. Sixty-five percent of participants were affiliated with academia, with the remainder coming from industry, government and nonprofit/nongovernment organizations; nine percent of participants did not disclose their affiliation. FY17 student and postdoc participation was 35%. The majority of attendees (67%) who disclosed year of birth were under 45 years of age. In general, attendee demographics were similar to those of the previous two years.

Some notable achievements and milestones included:

  • Keystone Symposia awarded 365 scholarships for conference attendance to deserving graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, funded by its own operating fund as well as generous donor and grant support.
  • Women were well-represented among scholarship recipients (51%). Seventeen scholarships were awarded to students and postdoctoral fellows from underrepresented backgrounds.
  • Global Health Travel Awards funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation enabled 211 investigators and clinicians from developing countries to attend meetings in the 2017 Keystone Symposia Global Health Series.
  • Attendees completing the exit surveys gave high ratings for professional development opportunities at Keystone Symposia conferences regardless of career stage, affiliation or meeting role. Seventy-six percent agreed that they made a useful contact at the conference they attended that will lead to a collaboration or sharing of information, data or techniques. Similarly, respondents recognized that the conference had the potential to impact their research regardless of career stage or affiliation. Eighty-five percent of attendees agreed that the conference facilitated interactions between junior and senior investigators.
  • Exit survey respondents reported very high ratings for the scientific content of the conferences regardless of age, region, affiliation or occupation, continuing the same trend observed over the last few years. Ninety-three percent of participants rated the scientific content "Excellent" or "Very Good."
  • According to exit survey responses, 46% of those participating were attending a Keystone Symposia conference for the first time.
  • Keystone Symposia expanded outreach beyond the 60 face-to-face conferences via public lectures for the Summit County, Colorado community and online “Virtual Keystone Symposia” events:
    • Noncoding RNAs: Current and Future Trends, an ePanel livestream featuring Drs. Frank Slack (moderator), Amy Pasquinelli, Pier Paolo Pandolfi and Anita Seto as panelists and broadcast to participants around the world.
    • Health Disparities: The Intersection of Science and Race, an online live panel discussion with Q&A featuring Drs. Irelene Ricks (moderator), Russell DeBose-Boyd, Glenn Simmons Jr., Amanda Marie James and Lovell Jones as panelists and broadcast to participants around the world.
    • HIV: Antibody Functions Beyond Neutralization, an online ePanel featuring Drs. Gabriella Scarlatti (moderator), Guido Ferrari, Ann J. Hessell and Robin Shattock as panelists and broadcast to participants around the world.
    • Malaria: From Innovation to Eradication, an online live panel discussion with Q&A featuring Drs. Marcel Tanner (moderator), Sarah K. Volkman, Marcus Lacerda, Jetsumon Prachumsri, Salim Abdulla, Silvie Huijben, Gawrie Loku Galappaththy, Elizabeth Chizema Kawesha and Vladimir Corredor as panelists and broadcast to participants around the world.

FY16 Program Accomplishments


Keystone Symposia's FY16 year (July 2015 — June 2016) featured 59 conferences across a diverse range of the life sciences that attracted the participation of 12,675 scientists from 87 countries. Sixty-five percent of participants were affiliated with academia, with the remainder coming from industry, government and nonprofit/nongovernment organizations; seven percent of participants did not disclose their affiliation. FY16 student and postdoc participation was 37%. The majority of attendees (65%) who disclosed year of birth were under 45 years of age. In general, attendee demographics were similar to those of the previous two years.

Some notable achievements and milestones included:

  • Keystone Symposia awarded 409 scholarships for conference attendance to deserving graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, funded by its own operating fund as well as generous donor and grant support.
  • Women were well-represented among scholarship recipients (58%). Fifty scholarships were awarded to students and postdoctoral fellows from underrepresented backgrounds. The majority of those recipients were Hispanic American (50%) and African American (46%).
  • Global Health Travel Awards funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation enabled 175 investigators and clinicians from developing countries to attend meetings in the 2016 Keystone Symposia Global Health Series. In August 2015, Keystone Symposia received a renewed multi-million-dollar grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, providing support of the Keystone Symposia Global Health series and Global Health Travel Awards through the end of calendar year 2018.
  • Attendees completing the exit surveys gave high ratings for professional development opportunities at Keystone Symposia conferences regardless of career stage, affiliation or meeting role. Seventy-nine percent agreed that they made a useful contact at the conference they attended that will lead to a collaboration or sharing of information, data or techniques. Similarly, respondents recognized that the conference had the potential to impact their research regardless of career stage or affiliation. Eighty-seven percent of attendees agreed that the conference facilitated interactions between junior and senior investigators.
  • Exit survey respondents reported very high ratings for the scientific content of the conferences regardless of age, region, affiliation or occupation, continuing the same trend observed over the last few years. Ninety-one percent of participants rated the scientific content "Excellent" or "Very Good."
  • According to exit survey responses, 47% of those participating were attending a Keystone Symposia conference for the first time.
  • Keystone Symposia expanded outreach beyond the 59 face-to-face conferences via public lectures for the Summit County, Colorado community and online “Virtual Keystone Symposia” events:
    • Challenges for Drug Discovery: Making Safer, More Effective Drugs to Treat Disease presented by Nobel Laureate Dr. Brian Kobilka to the local community on February 23rd, 2016
    • Between the Tiger the Crocodile: TB and HIV presented by Dr. Anne Goldfeld to the local community on March 2nd, 2016
    • From Neuroscience to Therapy: How Do We Get There, an online live panel discussion with Q&A featuring Drs. Steven Hyman, Benjamin Neale, Guoping Feng and Stacie Weninger as panelists and broadcast to participants in 66 countries around the world.

FY15 Program Accomplishments


FY15 featured 57 meetings across a diverse range of the life sciences that attracted the participation of 13,417 scientists from all over the world (87 countries). The majority of scientists were affiliated with academia (68%), with the remainder (25%) coming from industry, government and nonprofit/nongovernment organizations (7% of participants did not disclose their affiliation). FY15 student and postdoc participation was 41%. The majority of attendees (68%) who disclosed year of birth were under 45 years of age. In general, attendee demographics were similar to those of the previous two years.

Some notable achievements and milestones included:

  • Keystone Symposia awarded 466 scholarships for meeting attendance to deserving graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, funded by its own operating fund as well as generous donor support.
  • Women were well-represented among scholarship recipients (54%). Ninety-eight scholarships were awarded to students and postdoctoral fellows from underrepresented backgrounds. The majority of those recipients were Hispanic American (55%) and African American (26%).
  • Thanks to support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the São Paulo Research Foundation, 216 investigators and clinicians from developing countries received Global Health Travel Awards enabling them to attend infectious disease meetings in the 2015 Keystone Symposia Global Health Series. Keystone Symposia’s Global Health series will continue through 2018 thanks to a renewal of the generous Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation grant.
  • Keystone Symposia held its first conference in Copenhagen, Denmark (“Lipid Metabolism and Diabetes”) and in São Paulo, Brazil (“Cell Death Signaling”).
  • Exit survey respondents gave high ratings for professional development opportunities at the Keystone Symposia conferences regardless of career stage, affiliation or meeting role. Eighty percent agreed that they made a useful contact at the conference they attended that will lead to a collaboration or sharing of information, data or techniques. Similarly, respondents recognized that the meeting had potential to impact their research regardless of career stage or affiliation. Eighty-eight percent of attendees agreed that the conference facilitated interactions between junior and senior investigators.
  • Exit survey respondents reported very high ratings for the scientific content of the meetings regardless of age, region, affiliation or occupation, continuing the same trend observed over the last few years. Ninety-two percent of participants rated the scientific content "Excellent" or "Very Good."
  • Keystone Symposia conducted two public forums for the Summit County, Colorado community with panels of experts drawn from scientific conference speakers: on “The Viral Threat in the Age of Ebola” on January 13th, 2015 and on “Little Guys, Big Jobs: Microbes at Work in Your Body” on March 3rd, 2015.

FY14 Program Accomplishments


FY14 featured 58 meetings across a diverse range of the life sciences that attracted the participation of 12,235 scientists from all over the world (83 countries). The majority of scientists were affiliated with academia (68%), with the remainder (32%) coming from industry, government and nonprofit/nongovernment organizations (6% of participants did not disclose their affiliation). FY14 student and postdoc participation was 40% - slightly higher than the 2013 meeting season (39%). In keeping with trends from prior years, just over half of the attendees (51%) who disclosed year of birth were under 45 years of age. In general, attendee demographics were similar to those of the previous two years, with a slight up-tick in participation by industry (from 13% in FY13 to 15% in FY14).

Some notable achievements and milestones included:

  • Keystone Symposia was able to award 430 scholarships for meeting attendance to deserving graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, funded by its own operating fund as well as generous donor support.
  • Women were well-represented among scholarship recipients, and 69 of the recipients received scholarships specially designated for those from underrepresented backgrounds. The majority of those recipients were Hispanic American (43%) and African American (43%).
  • Thanks to support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, 138 investigators and clinicians from developing countries received Global Health Travel Awards enabling them to attend infectious disease meetings in the 2014 Keystone Symposia Global Health Series.
  • Keystone Symposia held its first conference in Mérida, Yucatán, Mexico (on "The Science of Malaria Eradication"). Additional new conference venues in FY14 included Rio de Janeiro, Brazil ("Advancing Vaccines in the Genomics Era"), San Francisco, California, USA ("Big Data in Biology"), Oberstdorf, Germany ("Chromatin Mechanisms and Cell Physiology") and Austin, Texas, USA ("Autophagy: Fundamentals to Disease").
  • Exit survey respondents gave high ratings for professional development opportunities at the Keystone Symposia conferences regardless of career stage, affiliation or meeting role. 80% agreed that they made a useful contact at the conference they attended that will lead to a collaboration or sharing of information, data or techniques. Similarly, respondents recognized that the meeting had potential to impact their research regardless of career stage or affiliation. 87% of attendees agreed that the conference facilitated interactions between junior and senior investigators.
  • Exit survey respondents reported very high ratings for the scientific content of the meetings regardless of age, region, affiliation or occupation, continuing the same trend observed over the last few years. 92% of participants rated the scientific content "Excellent" or "Very Good."
  • Keystone Symposia held its first online webcast event. 1,476 individuals registered to view this panel discussion on the topics of "HIV/AIDS: Strategies for an Endgame" either live when it aired on December 13, 2013 or in archived form.
  • Keystone Symposia conducted two events to share science with the lay public: one on "Breakthroughs in Alzheimer's Research" on March 4, 2014 and another on "Chronic Pain, Migraine and the Brain" on June 17, 2014. Featuring leading scientists presenting at Keystone Symposia conferences on the same topic, each was attended by more than 100 members of the local Summit County, Colorado community and was also filmed for broadcast to a wider audience as seen in the links above.

FY13 Program Accomplishments


FY13 featured 53 meetings across a diverse range of the life sciences that attracted the participation of 12,579 scientists from all over the world. The majority of scientists were affiliated with academia (69%), with the remainder (31%) coming from industry, government and nonprofit/nongovernment organizations (6% of participants did not disclose their affiliation). FY13 student and postdoc participation was 39% (consistent with the 2012 meeting season). In keeping with trends from prior years, the majority of attendees (69%) who disclosed year of birth were under 45 years of age. In general, attendee demographics were similar to those of the previous two years.

  • Keystone Symposia was able to award 411 scholarships for meeting attendance to deserving graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, funded by its own operating fund as well as generous donor support.
  • Women were well-represented among scholarship recipients, and 92 of the recipients received scholarships specially designated for those from underrepresented backgrounds. The majority of those recipients were Hispanic American or Latin American (51%) and African American (40%), corresponding to their proportions among the general population.
  • Thanks to support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, 194 investigators and clinicians from developing countries received Global Health Travel Awards enabling them to attend infectious disease meetings in the 2013 Keystone Symposia Global Health Series.
  • Keystone Symposia held its first conference in Brazil (on "The Innate Immune Response in the Pathogenesis of Infectious Disease"). Additional new conference venues in FY13 included New Orleans, USA ("Malaria"), Ottawa, Canada ("Immunological Mechanisms of Vaccination"), Tokyo, Japan ("Aging and Diseases of Aging") and Montreal, Canada ("Autophagy, Inflammation and Immunity").
  • Exit survey respondents gave high ratings for professional development opportunities at the Keystone Symposia conferences regardless of career stage, affiliation or meeting role. 80% reported that they made a useful contact at the conference they attended that will lead to a collaboration or sharing of information, data or techniques. Similarly, respondents recognized that the meeting had potential to impact their research regardless of career stage or affiliation. 87% of attendees agreed that the conference facilitated interactions between junior and senior investigators.
  • Exit survey respondents reported very high ratings for the scientific content of the meetings regardless of age, region, affiliation or occupation, continuing the same trend observed over the last few years. 92% of participants rated the scientific content "Excellent" or "Very Good." Meetings with fewer participants tend to be associated with scientific content "excellent" ratings above 70%.

FY12 Program Accomplishments


FY12 featured 55 meetings across a diverse range of the life sciences that attracted the participation of 12,360 scientists from all over the world. The majority of scientists were affiliated with academia (71%), with the remainder (26%) coming from industry, government and nonprofit/non-government organizations (3% of participants did not disclose their affiliation). FY12 student and postdoc participation was 40% (consistent with the 2011 meeting season). In keeping with trends from prior years, the majority of attendees (69%) who disclosed year of birth were under 45 years of age. In general, attendee demographics were similar to those of the previous two years.

  • Keystone Symposia was able to award 629 scholarships for meeting attendance to deserving graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, funded by its own operating fund as well as generous donor support.
  • Women were well-represented among scholarship recipients, and 78 of the recipients received scholarships specially designated for those from underrepresented backgrounds. The majority of those recipients were Hispanic American (44%) and African American (40%), corresponding to their proportions among the general population.
  • Thanks to support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, 197 investigators and clinicians from developing countries received Global Health Travel Awards enabling them to attend infectious disease meetings in the 2012 Keystone Symposia Global Health Series.
  • Keystone Symposia held its first conference in India (on "Malnutrition, Gut-Microbial Interactions and Mucosal Immunity to Vaccines").
  • Exit survey respondents gave high ratings for professional development opportunities at the Keystone Symposia conferences regardless of career stage, affiliation or meeting role. 79% reported that they made a useful contact at the conference they attended that will lead to a collaboration or sharing of information, data or techniques, while 94% learned a usable idea or technique as a result of conference attendance. Similarly, respondents recognized that the meeting had potential to impact their research regardless of career stage or affiliation. 84% of attendees agreed that the conference facilitated interactions between junior and senior investigators.
  • Exit survey respondents reported very high ratings for the scientific content of the meetings regardless of age, region, affiliation or occupation, continuing the same trend observed over the last few years. 92% of participants rated the scientific content "Excellent" or "Very Good." Meetings with fewer participants were associated with scientific content "excellent" ratings above 70%.